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Working on a script and i noticed that my ajax was riring about 10 fold more than intended so i put in an "fps counter" and noticed that rather than running 10times per second as intended chrome was running about 130 times per second ie/ff/opera about 35 frames per second. using the following set up:

function load(){ 
//other code that does not effect this
    requestAnimFrame(function(){
        load();
    });
    debug();//function i was using to catch fps
}

window.requestAnimFrame = (function(callback){
    return window.requestAnimationFrame ||
    window.webkitRequestAnimationFrame ||
    window.mozRequestAnimationFrame ||
    window.oRequestAnimationFrame ||
    window.msRequestAnimationFrame ||
    function(callback){
        window.setTimeout(callback, 100);
    };
})();

Now google chrome does not seem to care what value i put in window.setTimeout(callback, 100); it could be 1 or it could be 10000000 it runs at about 130frames reguardless the rest seem to obey it close enough (always about 3x the intended) And ive already made sure that i am not calling load() multiple times

on the other hand i used to use setTimeout(load, 100); And when i change to that all browsers start running at around 30fps

function load(){ 
    //other code that does not effect this

        debug();//function i was using to catch fps
        setTimeout(load, 100);
    }

Is it bad practice or out dated to do it like that? Point is i am not really sure WHY i am using the requestAnimFrame other then all the examples i find online use it aswell and it seemed to accomplish the given goal. And the only reason i am firing load over and over again is to check and see if there is any new info to come down..

EDIT And for those of you who read this in the future. After running line by line thru the code i found an error in logic that explained my 3x. I did make sure i was not running calling load() more then on place but

function connected(result){
    if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200){
        //code that does not matter for this
    }else if (xmlhttp.status==404){
        alert("epic failure i lost the page");
    }
    d_time = new Date().getTime();
    load();
}

Connect was being called by xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=connected; So it can fire many times running 3 sets of load(); What i needed to do was this:

function connected(result){
    if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200){
        d_time = new Date().getTime();
        load();
    }else if (xmlhttp.status==404){
        alert("epic failure i lost the page");
    }

}

So both schmit and patrick helped out here. schmit by letting me know i was a noob and was doing it wrong. patrick for helping me realize exactly what was happening on that function

share|improve this question
2  
100ms would be 10 frames per second... I'm going to venture a guess and say that the code for your "fps counter" is incorrect. –  Shmiddty Dec 14 '12 at 0:26
    
its not d_count/(( new Date().getTime() - d_time)/1000) .. d_time is set first run of the script and d_count is ++'d every time load() is run was the first thing i checked. Also its the same code running on all the browsers so chrome is still different from the rest –  Noname Provided Dec 14 '12 at 0:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Defining the function

window.requestAnimFrame()

this way will only use the setTimeout if none of the other functions exist. it could be rewritten more explicitly as:

window.requestAnimFrame = (function(callback){
    var theFunction;
    if (window.requestAnimationFrame) {
        theFunction = window.requestAnimationFrame;
    } else if (window.webkitRequestAnimationFrame) {
        theFunction = window.webkitRequestAnimationFrame;
    } else if (window.mozRequestAnimationFrame) {
        theFunction = window.mozRequestAnimationFrame;
    } else if (window.oRequestAnimationFrame) {
        theFunction = window.oRequestAnimationFrame;
    } else if (window.msRequestAnimationFrame) {
        theFunction = window.msRequestAnimationFrame;
    } else {
        theFunction = function(callback){
            window.setTimeout(callback, 100);
        };
    } 
    return theFunction;
})();

So it only uses the timeout if none of the other functions exist. This function is used to fall back on proprietary implementations of requestAnimationFrame in case it doesn't exist, like on old browsers. Those old browsers will use the timeout.

requestAnimationFrame by definition will have it's framerate determined by the client. That means it could run 180x per second (like you see in chrome) or 1x per second. It allows the client browser to determine what is most important, and gives it a way to turn off screen refreshes when it's not necessary (like when a tab is not active or when a mobile browser gets minimized).

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1  
You don't understand how || works do you? –  Shmiddty Dec 14 '12 at 0:40
    
Ahh so would be best if i kept it running off of requestanimframe and just throttled it down to no more than 10 per second on the ajax. That way if they minimized or something then the ajax wouldnt continue running? -To shmiddty i do and feel kinda foolish i wasnt quite thinking it through it did what i wanted at the time and then when i went back looking at it i read it wrong –  Noname Provided Dec 14 '12 at 0:41
1  
@Shmiddty, perhaps I don't, but the effect is the same as what I've written. In javascript at least, the || operator only evaluates until it gets a non-false result (false, "false", 0, "", null, undefined are all false). –  Patrick Gunderson Dec 14 '12 at 0:45
    
@NonameProvided yes, keep your ajax calls out of requestAnimationFrame –  Patrick Gunderson Dec 14 '12 at 0:46
    
awsome tyvm Patrick Gunderson –  Noname Provided Dec 14 '12 at 0:50

http://jsfiddle.net/VMyn8/1/

I do believe your fps timer is wrong. I'm getting a consistent 60FPS (around 62, actually) with webkitRequestAnimationFrame.

var last = new Date(),
    frames = [],
    div = document.getElementById("fps");

(function loop(){
    var span = ((new Date()) - last)/1000;
    last = new Date();
    frames.push(span);

    if (frames.length > 100) frames.shift();

    var total = 0;    
    for (var i = 0; i < frames.length; i++)total += frames[i];    

    div.innerHTML = Math.floor(frames.length/total);
    //setTimeout(loop, 1000/60);
    webkitRequestAnimationFrame(loop);
})();

If you are trying to poll the server, I'd suggest something entirely different:

(function poll(){
    // do some stuff

    setTimeout(poll, 3000); // poll every 3 seconds
    // if you are doing an ajax call, you'll want to place the timeout in the 
    // callback so you aren't initiating another call before you've received 
    // a response to the current one. 
})();
share|improve this answer
    
I dont know why i am getting 3x intended but whats improtant is getting the same cross browser –  Noname Provided Dec 14 '12 at 0:48
    
@NonameProvided feel free to remove them and see the result is the same. –  Shmiddty Dec 14 '12 at 0:52
    
Already did and face palmed myself for ya. But actually reading that code helped.. I just need to figure out how i wanna throttle it down so i am not spamming my server/db.. For those of you wondering i edited my reply up above it had originally said "thats because you have -webkit-animation: bounce .5s ease-in-out infinite; in your css" Noob yes... making the mistake of assuming and posting b4 checking again? no –  Noname Provided Dec 14 '12 at 0:53
    
Yep that's what i've changed it over to. I edited the question above aswell i found out why i was getting about 3x the frames as intended –  Noname Provided Dec 14 '12 at 1:07

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