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I have some linq code that I am trying to refactor because its not very good:

Basically, I am wondering if there is a better way to perform the following:

if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(_filter.AssignedTo)
{
var query = from ticket in dataClassesDataContext.TicketsIssues
            where ticket.ClosedDate == null 
            && cUser.GetUserNameUsingGUID(ticket.AssignTicketToUser) == _filter.AssignedTo                                                   
            select new
            {
                Priority = ticket.TicketPriority.TicketPriorityName,
                Description = ticket.Description.Replace("\n", ", "),
            };
}
else
{
var query = from ticket in dataClassesDataContext.TicketsIssues
            where ticket.ClosedDate == null 
            select new
            {
                Priority = ticket.TicketPriority.TicketPriorityName,
                Description = ticket.Description.Replace("\n", ", "),
            };
}

They are both identical apart from the where clause is checks for AssignTicketToUser.

I am hoping there is a nicer way to do this to avoid having to use an if else statement? I have a few of these code blocks and dont want to be duplicating code alot!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
var query = from ticket in dataClassesDataContext.TicketsIssues
            where ticket.ClosedDate == null 
            && (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(_filter.AssignedTo) ? true : cUser.GetUserNameUsingGUID(ticket.AssignTicketToUser) == _filter.AssignedTo)                                                   
            select new
            {
                Priority = ticket.TicketPriority.TicketPriorityName,
                Description = ticket.Description.Replace("\n", ", "),
            };

You can get rid of the if-else statement altogether. Transfer the if condition it to the 2nd where clause, and remove the !. That second where clause becomes a ternary operator.

If the condition is true, that is if _filter.AssignedTo is null, then don't test _filter.AssignedTo by returning true. If it's not null or empty, then proceed to the clause that was there in your original else block.

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5  
Instead of condition1 ? true : condition2 you could write (condition1 || condition2). –  Risky Martin Dec 14 '12 at 3:08
    
thanks, this is exactly what I am looking for.... and feel embarrassed I didnt think of this myself (combination of a new baby and late night working!). Thanks –  Belliez Dec 14 '12 at 18:15

one way could be:

var query = from ticket in dataClassesDataContext.TicketsIssues
            where ticket.ClosedDate == null 
            select new
            {
                Priority = ticket.TicketPriority.TicketPriorityName,
                Description = ticket.Description.Replace("\n", ", "),
            };

if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(_filter.AssignedTo)
    query = query.Where(w => cUser.GetUserNameUsingGUID(w.AssignTicketToUser) == _filter.AssignedTo));
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Take a look at the PredicateBuilder implementation from C# In a Nutshell, the And method should address your issue here, in a more generic way, and help build an understanding of LINQ and expression trees. You would end up with something like:

var query = from ticket in dataClassesDataContext.TicketsIssues
            where ticket.ClosedDate == null
            select new
            {
                Priority = ticket.TicketPriority.TicketPriorityName,
                Description = ticket.Description.Replace("\n", ", "),
            };

if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(_filter.AssignedTo))
{
     query = query.And(ticket => cUser.GetUserNameUsingGUID(ticket.AssignTicketToUser) == _filter.AssignedTo);
}
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