Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Task:
- given: a list of images filenames
- todo: create a new list with filenames not containing the word "thumb" - i.e. only target the non-thumbnail images (with PIL - Python Imaging Library).

I've tried r".*(?!thumb).*" but it failed.

I've found the solution (here on stackoverflow) to prepend a ^ to the regex and to put the .* into the negative lookahead: r"^(?!.*thumb).*" and this now works.

The thing is, I would like to understand why my first solution did not work but I don't. Since regexes are complicated enough, I would really like to understand them.

What I do understand is that the ^ tells the parser that the following condition is to match at the beginning of the string. But doesn't the .* in the (not working) first example also start at the beginning of the string? I thought it would start at the beginning of the string and search through as many characters as it can before reaching "thumb". If so it would return a non-match.

Could someone please explain why r".*(?!thumb).*" does not work but r"^(?!.*thumb).*" does?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Ummm - "not containing the word thumb" - emphasis mine... otherwise, why use a regex? – Jon Clements Dec 14 '12 at 2:50
    
Although the use of regular expression doesn't apply for this task (maybe a homework ?), the final question stands. – mmgp Dec 14 '12 at 2:53
    
Hey Jon, thanks for the quick reply. I used a regex because I started to dissect the paths into directory and filename with regexes. I am new to Python and regexes are the thing I stumbled upon when trying to deal with these tasks. Since I am new to Python I am probably not aware of other (simpler?) solutions. Could you explain the emphasis on 'word'? 'Word' as in 16bit integer? – Erik Dec 14 '12 at 2:54
    
Ok, thanks mmgp, got the comment about why it does not apply (task: create list ...), my real question: how to sort out strings that contain a certain word with the help of regular expressions in Python? – Erik Dec 14 '12 at 3:04
    
As @mmgp mentioned, I would still like to know, why the first regex example did not work whereas the second one does. – Erik Dec 14 '12 at 3:18
up vote 2 down vote accepted

(Darn, Jon beat me. Oh well, you can look at the examples anyway)

Like the other guys have said, regex is not the best tool for this job. If you are working with filepaths, take a look at os.path.

As for filtering files you don't want, you can do if 'thumb' not in filename: ... once you have dissected the path (where filename is a str).

And for posterity, here are my thoughts on those regex. r".*(?!thumb).*" does not work as because .* is greedy and the lookahead is given a very low priority. Take a look at this:

>>> re.search('(.*)((?!thumb))(.*)', '/tmp/somewhere/thumb').groups()
('/tmp/somewhere/thumb', '', '')
>>> re.search('(.*?)((?!thumb))(.*)', '/tmp/somewhere/thumb').groups()
('', '', '/tmp/somewhere/thumb')
>>> re.search('(.*?)((?!thumb))(.*?)', '/tmp/somewhere/thumb').groups()
('', '', '')

The last one is quite strange...

The other regex (r"^(?!.*thumb).*") works because .* is inside the lookahead, so you don't have any issues with characters being stolen. You actually don't even need the ^, depending on if you are using re.match or re.search:

>>> re.search('((?!.*thumb))(.*)', '/tmp/somewhere/thumb').groups()
('', 'humb')
>>> re.search('^((?!.*thumb))(.*)', '/tmp/somewhere/thumb').groups()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'groups'
>>> re.match('((?!.*thumb))(.*)', '/tmp/somewhere/thumb').groups()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'groups'
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for examples – Jon Clements Dec 14 '12 at 3:46
    
@Balthamos - in your example I can see very well that the first (.*) consumes the complete string and that the ? makes it non-greedy (why empty? maybe because * also allows for 0 matches? not quite an idea). I've tried omitting the ^ and it resulted in humb.jpg. So it seems that the (?!.*thumb) consumes everything starting with thumb, no matter what comes before it and the trailing .*catches everything that does not start with thumb, namely the rest: humb.jpg. Why the negative lookahead does not throw a no match and there is a valid result still remains a mystery to me. – Erik Dec 14 '12 at 4:09
    
Ok, I've tried re.match instead of re.search and it returned no match. It seems the re.match does what the ^ did in my working regex example. Good to note that re.search is not stopped by a matching negative lookahead if there are other parts of the regex that can be matched (.* etc.). – Erik Dec 14 '12 at 4:16
    
Though this does not explain why this is so and why ^ works the same as re.match. But I'll crack that one another day ;). – Erik Dec 14 '12 at 4:21
    
'why empty? maybe because * also allows for 0 matches? not quite an idea' Yes, you got it. 'Why the negative lookahead does not throw a no match and there is a valid result still remains a mystery to me' That was strange to me too. I'd need to look think about it harder to come up for a good reason as to why it's doing that. re.match must match the entire string (essentially '^regex$') re.search can match any part of the string (essentially ^.*regex.*$) – Balthamos Dec 15 '12 at 4:01

Could someone please explain why r".*(?!thumb).*" does not work but r"^(?!.*thumb).*" does?

The first will always match as the .* will consume all the string (so it can't be followed by anything for the negative lookahead to fail). The second is a bit convoluted and will match from the start of the line, the most amount of characters until it encounters 'thumb' and if that's present, then the entire match fails, as the line does begin with something followed by 'thumb'.

Number two is more easily written as:

  • 'thumb' not in string
  • not re.search('thumb', string) (instead of match)

Also as I mentioned in the comments, your question says:

filenames not containing the word "thumb"

So you may wish to consider whether or not thumbs up is supposed to be excluded or not.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Jon. The comment that .* will consume the string did the trick. So after .* is parsed, nothing is left to evaluate and the parser goes right through to the end of the string? If that is so, I now understand why the ^(?!.*thumb).* solution does work: it includes the word 'thumb' in the negative lookahead and thus keeps the .* from rushing past it. And without the trailing .*, it gives an empty result / match (but still a result / match). The two other notations you mentioned (and the ones from @larsks) are much easier for this task of course, so thanks for that! – Erik Dec 14 '12 at 3:40
    
@erik Think you've put that better than I did :) – Jon Clements Dec 14 '12 at 3:42
    
:) thanks a lot! – Erik Dec 14 '12 at 3:47
    
About: "So you may wish to consider whether or not thumbs up is supposed to be excluded or not." My (image) filenames were named like filename.jpg and filename_thumb.jpg so simply searching for thumb somewhere in the string would not have caused a problem in my case. Thanks for pointing out! – Erik Dec 14 '12 at 3:52

Ignoring all the bits about regular expressions, your task seems relatively simple:

  • given: a list of images filenames
  • todo: create a new list with filenames not containing the word "thumb" - i.e. only target the non-thumbnail images (with PIL - Python Imaging Library).

Assuming you have a list of filenames that looks something like this:

filenames = [ 'file1.jpg', 'file1-thumb.jpg', 'file2.jpg', 'file2-thumb.jpg' ]

Then you can get a list of files not containing the word thumb like this:

not_thumb_filenames = [ filename for filename in filenames if not 'thumb' in filename ]

That's what we call a list comprehension, and is essentially shorthand for:

not_thumb_filenames = []
for filename in filenames:
  if not 'thumb' in filename:
    not_thumb_filenames.append(filename)

Regular expressions aren't really necessary for this simple task.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your comprehensive answer! As mentioned, I was not aware of other solutions to this. I've used regexes in a Perl script ages ago so they were the first goto solution when dealing with search / match problems. – Erik Dec 14 '12 at 3:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.