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I need help understanding the following Haskell function,

split l = rr++[ll]
            where
              split = foldl
                        ( \ (c,a) e ->
                               case c of
                                [] -> ([e],a)  
                                _ -> if e*(head c) < 0
                                     then ([e],a++[c])
                                     else (c++[e],a))
                        ([],[])
              (ll,rr) = split l

> split [1,2,3,-1,-2,7,4,-3,-5,-6,2,3]
[[1,2,3],[-1,-2],[7,4],[-3,-5,-6],[2,3]]

It splits consecutive numbers with the same sign in separate lists as seen above. In Scheme, the tracer function was so helpful in evaluating expressions step by step, but unfortunately, GHCi doesn't have such a feature. Please help me step through the code. Thanks!

Note: I understand the foldl part of the function. It is the pattern matching part (split l = rr++[ll] and (ll,rr) = split l) which really confuses me!

share|improve this question
    
Which pattern-matching part - do you mean the case expression? What about it confuses you? –  Ben Millwood Dec 14 '12 at 3:38
    
I mean, the algorithm itself is intensely confusing and, well, downright perverse :) – try it on a list that starts with 0. But you should be clear if it's that or the syntax or what that you're stuck on. –  Ben Millwood Dec 14 '12 at 3:41
    
For what it's worth, GHCi can do tracing. I don't remember how at the moment, though... –  javawizard Dec 14 '12 at 3:42
    
I understand the case expression part of the foldl. split l = rr++[ll] and (ll,rr) = split l confuses me, Thanks! :) Yeah, asked it elsewhere and was told that it was bad code! –  Faizal Dec 14 '12 at 3:42
    
I edited the question to include your clarification here, I hope you don't mind (please feel free to do it differently) –  Ben Millwood Dec 14 '12 at 3:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I think what may be confusing you here is that in fact the split inside the where is in fact entirely different from the split at the top level – the inner one "shadows" the outer one, just like local variables override global ones. The following code does the exact same thing:

split l = rr++[ll]
            where
              notSplit = foldl
                        ( \ (c,a) e ->
                               case c of
                                [] -> ([e],a)  
                                _ -> if e*(head c) < 0
                                     then ([e],a++[c])
                                     else (c++[e],a))
                        ([],[])
              (ll,rr) = notSplit l

So we call notSplit on the input list, which returns a tuple (ll,rr), then we calculate rr ++ [ll] and return that.

(As my comment said above, the algorithm is needlessly obscure, inefficient, and incorrect on lists including zeroes. But that's another issue entirely).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I did think the split inside is the same as the split outside. Thanks! :) –  Faizal Dec 14 '12 at 4:33

Think about exactly what the foldl expression produces. As it goes through the list, it accumulates a tuple (c, a). The first element of this tuple, c, is always a list of numbers. a is a list of lists of numbers---which happens to be what you want to return.

When you get a new number, if it has the same sign as the numbers in c, you add it to c. If it has a different sign than what's currently in c, you take all of c and put it into a.

At the very end, you get a tuple of the last value of c and a. a is almost exactly the result you want, except it isn't complete: you need to add c to it. So the very end of the expression

(ll, rr) = split l

takes the result of split (which is c and a) and assigns c to ll and a to rr. The final answer is then just rr with ll appended to the end.

share|improve this answer
    
Your explanation was really clear! Thank you! :) I will upvote your answer when I can. –  Faizal Dec 14 '12 at 4:38

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