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I have seen people use an alternate define "syntax" in require js than what is described in the require js' documentation, or in many tutorials.

The usual define "syntax":

define(['module/first'], function (firstModule) {
   //Module code with a dependency on module/first goes here.
});

The alternate define "syntax":

<script data-main="app/config" src="assets/js/libs/require.js"></script>

file: config.js:

require.config({
   paths: {
      jquery:      '../assets/js/libs/jquery'
   }
});
require(['app']);

file: app.js:

define(function(require) {
     var FirstModule = require('modules/first');
     //Module code with a dependency on module/first goes here.

What are the advantages, and disadvantages of using this alternate "syntax"?

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1 Answer

up vote 24 down vote accepted

I think your explanation is a bit misleading: in both cases, you will have a top-level require call with a data-main attribute specifying a file to kick-start the process of requiring different modules.

So typically you will have this in your HTML:

<script data-main="app/config" src="assets/js/libs/require.js"></script>

Then, in both cases, you would have a file app/config which sets your configuration (although you could do this directly in the HTML) and more importantly calls require on your modules:

require.config({
  paths: {
    jquery:      '../assets/js/libs/jquery'
  }
});
require(['app']);

Now, it's when we get to defining modules with dependencies that these styles differ. In the amd style you pass in the module names (paths) as an array, and a function which takes the same number of arguments:

app.js

define(['module/first', 'module/second', 'module/third'], function (firstModule, secondModule, thirdModule) {
  // use firstModule, secondModule, thirdModule here
});

In the simplified CommonJS syntax, you just pass require into define and then require whatever modules you need inline:

app.js

define(function(require) {
  var firstModule = require('modules/first');
  var secondModule = require('modules/second');
  var thirdModule = require('modules/third');
  // use firstModule, secondModule, thirdModule here

}

Getting back to your original question, the advantages of the CommonJS style over the amd style should be clear.

For one thing, with the conventional syntax, if there are many modules being required, it is very easy to mistakenly assign modules to the wrong variable names. Consider this common case:

define(['jquery', 'underscore', 'backbone', 'modules/first', 'modules/second', 'modules/third', 'i18n', 'someOtherModule'], function ($, _, Backbone, first, second, third, I18n, someOtherModule) {
  // ...
});

Right away, you can see that when we add a new module to this list, we have to be very careful that the corresponding new function argument appears in the right place, or else we can have jQuery assigned to Backbone, etc. In some cases this can create very subtle bugs that are hard to track down.

Now consider the CommonJS syntax:

define(function(require) {
  var $ = require('jquery');
  var _ = require('underscore');
  var Backbone = require('backbone');
  var firstModule = require('modules/first');
  var secondModule = require('modules/second');
  var thirdModule = require('modules/third');
  var I18n = require('i18n');
  var someOtherModule = require('someOtherModule');
  // ...
}

Note that:

  1. The pairing of module to variable name is very clear.
  2. The order of the require statements is not important, since the variable names are being paired separately rather than as a mapping between an array and a function.
  3. The modules do not need to be assigned first. They can be assigned anywhere, so long as it is before the module is actually used.

Those are just a few reasons that come to mind, I'm sure there are others. Basically, if you just have one or two dependencies, either syntax will do fine. But if you have a complex network of module dependencies, the CommonJS syntax is probably preferable.

Note that in the RequireJS docs, they mention this small caveat:

Not all browsers give a usable Function.prototype.toString() results. As of October 2011, the PS 3 and older Opera Mobile browsers do not. Those browsers are more likely to need an optimized build of the modules for network/device limitations, so just do a build with an optimizer that knows how to convert these files to the normalized dependency array form, like the RequireJS optimizer.

But this is not a major issue:

Since the number of browsers that cannot support this toString() scanning is very small, it is safe to use this sugared forms for all your modules, particularly if you like to line up the dependency names with the variables that will hold their module values.

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I agree with the commonjs style advantages. Do you have any idea or thoughts why the amd style is favored in the tutorials, and in the requirejs docs? If the outcome is the same, why don't we recommend everyone to use the commonjs style? Is the only reason the "small caveat"? –  joholo Dec 14 '12 at 4:46
1  
I can't really say, but I suppose it's mostly historical: the amd format is the standard, whereas the simplified CommonJS is a "sugar" layer on top of that. If you're going to teach RequireJS, then it makes sense to go with the format that has a longer history and broader adoption, even if the "sugared" version is simpler and arguably better. Mind you I'm mostly just hypothesizing here. –  shioyama Dec 14 '12 at 8:27
1  
You could also argue, I suppose, that by forcing you to define all your dependencies at the top of a module (before anything else), the amd format makes those dependencies easier to grok at a glance. Although if you use the CommonJS format and stick to putting the dependencies at the top of the module then this is not really an issue. –  shioyama Dec 14 '12 at 8:29
    
Makes sense. Thank you. –  joholo Dec 14 '12 at 14:10
1  
This is a great answer, if only the RequireJS docs were so lucid. –  Wintamute Dec 22 '12 at 18:17
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