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I am creating a metronome program and the for loop is executing +1 times than it should.

public class Tempo {

String file;
int bpm;

public Tempo(int bpm, String file){
    this.bpm=bpm;
    this.file=file;
}

public void tempoPlay () throws InterruptedException{
    new Play(file).start();
    Thread.sleep(60000/bpm); 

}

public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
    Tempo t = new Tempo(120, "C:\\Users\\Korisnik\\Desktop\\dome3.wav");

    for(int i=0;i<20;i++){
        t.tempoPlay();
    }
}
}

The first beat is rapidly followed by the second one but later as it goes it is sounding compliant. I've counted it plays 21 beats but it should play 20. Here's the Play class:

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioFormat;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioInputStream;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioSystem;
import javax.sound.sampled.DataLine;
import javax.sound.sampled.FloatControl;
import javax.sound.sampled.LineUnavailableException;
import javax.sound.sampled.SourceDataLine;
import javax.sound.sampled.UnsupportedAudioFileException;

class Play extends Thread {

private String filename;
private Position curPosition;
private final int EXTERNAL_BUFFER_SIZE = 524288; // 128Kb 

enum Position {

    LEFT, RIGHT, NORMAL
};

public Play(String wavfile) {
    filename = wavfile;
    curPosition = Position.NORMAL;
}

public Play(String wavfile, Position p) {
    filename = wavfile;
    curPosition = p;
}

@Override
public void run() {

    File soundFile = new File(filename);
    if (!soundFile.exists()) {
        System.err.println("Wave file not found: " + filename);
        return;
    }

    AudioInputStream audioInputStream = null;
    try {
        audioInputStream = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(soundFile);
    } catch (UnsupportedAudioFileException e1) {
        e1.printStackTrace();
        return;
    } catch (IOException e1) {
        e1.printStackTrace();
        return;
    }

    AudioFormat format = audioInputStream.getFormat();
    SourceDataLine auline = null;
    DataLine.Info info = new DataLine.Info(SourceDataLine.class, format);

    try {
        auline = (SourceDataLine) AudioSystem.getLine(info);
        auline.open(format);
    } catch (LineUnavailableException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return;
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return;
    }

    if (auline.isControlSupported(FloatControl.Type.PAN)) {
        FloatControl pan = (FloatControl) auline
                .getControl(FloatControl.Type.PAN);
        if (curPosition == Position.RIGHT) {
            pan.setValue(1.0f);
        } else if (curPosition == Position.LEFT) {
            pan.setValue(-1.0f);
        }
    }

    auline.start();
    int nBytesRead = 0;
    byte[] abData = new byte[EXTERNAL_BUFFER_SIZE];

    try {
        while (nBytesRead != -1) {
            nBytesRead = audioInputStream.read(abData, 0, abData.length);
            if (nBytesRead >= 0) {
                auline.write(abData, 0, nBytesRead);
            }
        }
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return;
    } finally {
        auline.drain();
        auline.close();
    }

}

}
share|improve this question
1  
1) I suggest to use a Clip for this. It has handy methods like loop(int) See an example on the Java Sound tag Wiki 2) If a method requires a File, specify a File in the signature and be done with it, passing around strings that represent file paths leads to no end of confusion. 3) But having said that, unless you are getting the sound from the user (unlikely), the clip will need to be referenced by URL at run-time. –  Andrew Thompson Dec 14 '12 at 3:37
1  
I ran your program adding a couple of System.out.prints in run (init/end) and after sorting the output and counting the line number, I got 20 calls to run(), beside that, using a different wav file (with a different sleep time that lets the plays to be solapated enough) I could clearly hear the file being played 20 times. Are you completely sure that there are 21 plays? –  higuaro Dec 14 '12 at 3:51

1 Answer 1

Shot in the dark: It might be worthwhile to read the file into memory completely for testing purposes. A guess as to what might be happening is that the I/O from reading the file is interfering with the timing of the playback.

You might be able to get away with this to test.

Tempo t = new Tempo(120, "C:\\Users\\Korisnik\\Desktop\\dome3.wav");

t.tempoPlay() // ignore this
Thread.sleep(10);

for(int i=0;i<20;i++){
    t.tempoPlay();
} 

Or better yet, have Tempo cache the read in before playing the sound.

share|improve this answer
    
This is working out pretty well, the for is working like it should right now, but the first 2 beats are off as they were. Putting it the way you suggested it mostly makes them sound off but in like 1/8 cases they are not. Could this be because of the netbeans? Does it need some time to 'adapt' as the program runs? –  Mihajel Petrovic Dec 14 '12 at 4:03
    
It likely has something do with your machine - memory or disk i/o. You can also try the compiler option -XX:CompileThreshold=1 –  dfb Dec 14 '12 at 4:09

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