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Following command doesn't pick 2nd string from odd line and 4th from odd-even line. show_statistic.sh | grep -A 1 vlan | awk '{ if ( ( NR % 2 ) == 1 ) { print $2 } else { print $4 } }'
It prints each line's second and fourth string. What I did wrong?

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2  
What's an odd-even line? Can you show up some sample input, and expected output? – sampson-chen Dec 14 '12 at 3:47
1  
Show the output of show_statistics.sh and tell us what you're trying to do along with some expected output at the end of your processing of the show_statistics.sh output. You do not need grep with awk and you're using awk incorrectly so we need to start from step 1. – Ed Morton Dec 14 '12 at 4:27
    
@sampson-chen English is not my native language. odd-even can be 2nd, 4th, 6th .. { n=1 odd-even=2*n, even=2*n-1 } lines as our dictionary :-) – tsoomo Dec 25 '12 at 4:17
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks like your expected result is from the lines containing "vlan" and the following ones.

Your code will work with an unique response, but with more response than one your differents results will be separated bi a line containig only "--" as documented in grep :

  -A NUM
      Places  a  line  containing  a  group  separator  (--)   between
      contiguous  groups  of  matches.  With the -o or --only-matching
      option, this has no effect and a warning is given.

So with this line more you will want the second argument on line 1, 4, 7... And the fourth on line 2, 5, 8...

So you code can be :

show_statistic.sh | grep -A 1 vlan | awk '{  if ( ( NR % 3 ) == 1 ) { print $2 } else { if ( NR % 3 == 2 ) { print $4 } } }'

I write a little text file to test :

1line here
2foo
vlan 2a 3a 4a 5a
1 2 3 4 5
bar

line here
vlan 2a 3a 4a 5a
1 2 3 4 5
line here
baz

The result is :

$ grep -A 1 vlan file| awk '{  if ( ( NR % 3 ) == 1 ) { print $2 } else { if ( NR % 3 == 2 ) { print $4 } } }'
2a
4
2a
4
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+1 for figuring out a layout for the shell command output. – Ed Morton Dec 14 '12 at 16:28
    
Thank you Pierre-Louis Laffont. Group separator (--) was the 3rd line :-) I got it – tsoomo Dec 25 '12 at 4:14

If the output from your shell command follows the layout of the sample file created by @Pierre-LouisLaffont then here's the full command you should be using:

$ awk 'f{print $4;f=0} /vlan/{print $2;f=1}' file
2a
4
2a
4

When if finds vlan it prints the 2nd field and sets a flag to say vlan was found. On the next line it prints the 4th field and resets the flag. Couldn't be much simpler.

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it works more faster. Thanks @Ed Morton – tsoomo Dec 26 '12 at 3:15

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