Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to write a program to draw all possible paths in a given matrix that can be had by moving in only left, right and up direction. One should not cross the same location more than once. Note also that on a particular path, we may or may not use motion in all possible directions.

Path will start in the bottom-left corner in the matrix and will reach the top-right corner. Following symbols are used to denote the direction of the motion in the current position:

 +---+
 | > |  right
 +---+
 +---+
 | ^ |  up
 +---+
 +---+
 | < |  left
 +---+

The symbol * is used in the final location to indicate end of path.

Example:

For a 5x8 matrix, using left, right and up directions, 2 different paths are shown below.

Path 1:

 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 |   |   |   |   |   |   |   | * |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 |   |   | > | > | > | > | > | ^ |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 |   |   | ^ | < | < |   |   |   |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 |   | > | > | > | ^ |   |   |   |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 | > | ^ |   |   |   |   |   |   |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+

Path 2

 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 |   |   |   | > | > | > | > | * |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 |   |   |   | ^ | < | < |   |   |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 |   |   |   |   |   | ^ |   |   |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 |   |   | > | > | > | ^ |   |   |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 | > | > | ^ |   |   |   |   |   |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+

Can anyone help me with this?

I tried to solve using lists. It i soon realized that i am making a disaster. Here is the code i tried with.

 solution x y = travel (1,1) (x,y) 
 travelRight (x,y) = zip [1..x] [1,1..] ++ [(x,y)] 
 travelUp (x,y) = zip [1,1..] [1..y] ++ [(x,y)]
 minPaths = [[(1,1),(2,1),(2,2)],[(1,1),(1,2),(2,2)]]

 travel startpos (x,y) = rt (x,y) ++ up (x,y)

 rt (x,y) | odd y = map (++[(x,y)]) (furtherRight (3,2) (x,2) minPaths)
          | otherwise = furtherRight (3,2) (x,2) minPaths
 up (x,y) | odd x = map (++[(x,y)]) (furtherUp (2,3) (2,y) minPaths)
          | otherwise = furtherUp (2,3) (2,y) minPaths

 furtherRight currpos endpos paths | currpos == endpos = (travelRight currpos) : map (++[currpos]) paths
                                   | otherwise = furtherRight (nextRight currpos) endpos ((travelRight currpos) : (map (++[currpos]) paths))
 nextRight (x,y) = (x+1,y)

 furtherUp currpos endpos paths | currpos == endpos = (travelUp currpos) : map (++[currpos]) paths
                                | otherwise = furtherUp (nextUp currpos) endpos ((travelUp currpos) : (map(++[currpos]) paths))
 nextUp (x,y) = (x,y+1)

 identify lst = map (map iden) lst
 iden (x,y) = (x,y,1)


 arrows lst = map mydir lst
 mydir (ele:[]) = "*"
 mydir ((x1,y1):(x2,y2):lst) | x1==x2 = '>' : mydir ((x2,y2):lst)
                             | otherwise = '^' : mydir ((x2,y2):lst)

 surroundBox lst = map (map createBox) lst
 bar = "+    -+"
 mid x = "| "++ [x] ++" |"
 createBox chr = bar ++ "\n" ++ mid chr ++ "\n" ++ bar ++ "\n"
share|improve this question
    
Searching all possible path is not good as there will be exponential number of paths. Do you want to get the shortest path or something ? If you still want all possible paths I think you can reduce your problem to a dynamic programming one and then can program that. –  Satvik Dec 14 '12 at 4:34
1  
Maybe you can start from a simpler case. List all the paths for a 2x2 matrix, or even a 2x1 matrix. Then, given that you have that list, how can you get a list for a matrix that's just a bit bigger? –  MatrixFrog Dec 14 '12 at 4:55
1  
This problem belongs more to algorithms than to haskell. Why the tag io ? –  Satvik Dec 14 '12 at 5:13
    
Updated the tags! @Satvik: i need all paths thats how the problem is stated. –  Abhimanyu Shegokar Dec 14 '12 at 6:14

3 Answers 3

This ASCII grids are much more confusing than enlightening. Let me describe a better way to represent each possible path.

Each non-top row will have exactly one cell with UP. I claim that once each of the UP cells has been chosen that the LEFT and RIGHT and EMPTY cells can be determined. I claim that all possible cells in each of the non-top rows can be UP in all combination.

Each path is thus isomorphic to a (rows-1) length list of numbers in the range (1..columns) that determine the UP cells. The number of allowed paths is thus columns^(rows-1) and enumerating the possible paths in this format should be easy.

Then you could make a printer that converts this format to the ASCII art. This may be annoying, depending on skill level.

share|improve this answer
    
i didn't get your explanation. Can you please put it down in haskell code? –  Abhimanyu Shegokar Dec 14 '12 at 13:02
1  
@AbhimanyuShegokar there can not be two UP markers in one row as there are no DOWN markers at all and we must reach TOP-right corner somehow. So each non-top row will hold exactly one UP marker among its cells. If there are C columns, there are C possible placements on an UP marker in each non-top row. If there are R total rows, there are (R-1) non-top rows. Thus, total number of placements of UP markers in non-top rows is C^(R-1). This is also the number of possible paths, as the placements of UP markers uniquely determine the markers in all other cells. (try it w/ some example, it's easy). –  Will Ness Jan 17 '13 at 11:01

Looks like a homework so I will try to give enough hints

  • Try first filling number of paths from a cell to your goal.

So

 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | * |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+

The thing to note here is from the cell in the top level there will always be one path to the *.

  • Number of possible path from cells in the same row will be same. You can realize this as all the paths will ultimately have to move up as there is no down action so in any path the cell above the current row can be reached by any cell in the current row.

  • You can feel the all possible paths from the current cell has its relation with the possible paths from the cell left,right and above. But as we know we can find all possible paths from only one cell in a row and rest of cells' possible paths will be some movements in the same row followed by a suffix of possible paths from that cell.

Maybe I will give you a example

 +---+---+---+
 | 1 | 1 | * | 
 +---+---+---+
 |   |   |   |  
 +---+---+---+
 |   |   |   |   
 +---+---+---+

You know all possible paths from cells in the first row. You need to find the same in the second row. So a good strategy would be to do it for the right most cell

 +---+---+---+
 | > | > | * | 
 +---+---+---+
 | ^ | < | < |  
 +---+---+---+
 |   |   |   |   
 +---+---+---+

 +---+---+---+
 |   | > | * | 
 +---+---+---+
 |   | ^ | < |  
 +---+---+---+
 |   |   |   |   
 +---+---+---+

 +---+---+---+
 |   |   | * | 
 +---+---+---+
 |   |   | ^ |  
 +---+---+---+
 |   |   |   |   
 +---+---+---+

Now finding this for rest of the cells in the same row is trivial using these as I have told before.

In the end if you have m X n matrix the number of paths from bottom-left corner to top-right corner will be n^(m-1).

Another way

This way is not very optimal but easy to implement. Consider m X n grid

  • Find the path of longest length. You dont need the exact path just the number of <,>,^. You can find the direct formula in terms of m and n.

Like

 ^ = m - 1
 < = (n-1) * floor((m-1)/2) 
 > = (n-1) * (floor((m-1)/2) + 1)
  • Any valid path will be a prefix of the permutations of this which you can search exhaustively. Use permutations from Data.List to get all possible permutations. Then make a function which given a path strips a valid path from this. map this over the list of permutations and remove duplicates. The thing to note is path will be a prefix of what you get from permutation, so there can be several permutations for the same path.
share|improve this answer
    
Its not a homework. It was asked in our exam i was unable to figure out how to do it so i have posted it over here. Complete solution would be really useful. Anyways thanks a lot!! –  Abhimanyu Shegokar Dec 14 '12 at 6:12
    
@AbhimanyuShegokar Look the other way I have described. It is very easy to implement so you can try it but it will blow up for very small grids. –  Satvik Dec 14 '12 at 7:44

Can you create that matrix and define the "fields"? Even if you can't (a specific matrix is given), you can map an [(Int, Int)] matrix (which sounds reasonable for this kind of task) to your own representation.

Since you didn't specify what your skill level was, I hope you don't mind that I suggest that you first try to create some kind of a grid in order to have something to work on:

data Status = Free | Left | Right | Up
    deriving (Read, Show, Eq)
type Position = (Int, Int)
type Field = (Position, Status)
type Grid = [Field]

grid :: Grid
grid = [((x, y), stat) | x <- [1..10], y <- [1..10], let stat = Free]

Of course there are other ways to achieve this. Afterwards you can define some movement, map Position to Grid index and Statuses to printable characters... Try to fiddle with it and you might get some ideas.

share|improve this answer
    
my skill level is moderate but the problem seems too difficult :D. Can you please provide entire solution? –  Abhimanyu Shegokar Dec 14 '12 at 6:20
1  
Naaah, this is not how it works :P. But I can provide further hints as soon as you are able to state your problem more precisely. Have you tried anything? –  yzb3 Dec 14 '12 at 6:23
    
Edit your question to include the code you tried with. Since your problem is not complicated, you may safely remove one of the grids you drew. –  yzb3 Dec 14 '12 at 6:31
    
Updated problem with my code. –  Abhimanyu Shegokar Dec 14 '12 at 6:33
    
Man, it's messy - I won't be able to provide serious feedback before I return from work, but I can already tell you that you are trying to do too many things at once. My advice for now is not to debug it, but to try to think about the solution in terms of breaking the problem into some steps and writing it anew. –  yzb3 Dec 14 '12 at 6:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.