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When using nested structures I tend to do something like the following. I would like to know if that's the proper way to initialize structs in this particular case or if there's a better way of doing it.

#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct inner_struct { 
   char *name;
   int account;
} inner;

typedef struct outer_struct {
   int count;
   char *company; 
   inner *my_inner;
} outer;

outer *
initialize_outer (size_t max) {
   outer *out = malloc(sizeof (outer) * max);
   if (out) {
      memset(out, 0, sizeof *out * max);
      out->count = 0;
      out->company = NULL; 
   }   
   return out;
}

inner *
initialize_inner () {
   inner *in = malloc(sizeof (inner));
   if (in) {
      memset(in, 0, sizeof *in);
      in->account = 0;
      in->name = NULL; 
   }   
   return in; 
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
   int i;
   size_t max_out = 20;
   outer *my_out = initialize_outer(max_out);
   for (i = 0; i<max_out;i++) {
      my_out[i].my_inner = initialize_inner();
   }
}
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1  
Why do you assign 0 to variables after a memset? –  imreal Dec 14 '12 at 5:10
    
@Nick: that's exactly the part I wasn't sure of. Apparently is not needed. –  Pete Darrow Dec 14 '12 at 5:21
    
It is not needed: a bigger problem is that you allocate a bunch of outers and then allocate a bunch of inners but assign them just to the first outer. –  imreal Dec 14 '12 at 5:25
    
I meant to do my_out[i].my_inner. Thanks for the heads up! –  Pete Darrow Dec 14 '12 at 5:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
outer *
initialize_outer (size_t max) {
    outer *out = malloc(sizeof (outer) * max);
    if (out) {
        memset(out, 0, sizeof (outer) * max);
        out->count = 0; // no need assign 0 to 'account' and NULL to 'name' field
        out->company = NULL; // because memset already assigns 0 to it.
    }   
    return out;
}

inner *
initialize_inner (size_t max) {
    inner *in = malloc(sizeof (inner) * max);
    if (in) {
        memset(in, 0, sizeof (inner) * max);
        in->account = 0; // no need assign 0 to 'account' and NULL to 'name' field
        in->name = NULL; // because memset already assigns 0 to it.
    }   
    return in; 
}

Try this...I hope this helps...

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so basically memset would init the struct fields to 0 regardless their type, is that correct? –  Pete Darrow Dec 14 '12 at 5:22
1  
memset just wants pointer and size, not type.... –  Adeel Ahmed Dec 14 '12 at 5:29
    
is the above solution(CODE) helpful –  Adeel Ahmed Dec 14 '12 at 5:31
    
You also need to initialize out->my_inner, if you want to use it.... –  anishsane Dec 14 '12 at 8:57

Why not use calloc():

outer *
initialize_outer (size_t max) {
    return calloc(max, sizeof(outer));
}

inner *
initialize_inner (size_t max) {
    return calloc(max, sizeof(inner));
}

However, I would probably do this for simplicity:

typedef struct outer_struct {
    int count;
    char *company; 
    inner my_inner[];
} outer;

outer *
initialize (size_t max_out, size_t max_in) {
    return calloc(1, (sizeof (outer) + sizeof (inner) * max_in) * max_out);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
    size_t max_out = 20, max_in = 10; 
    outer *my_out = initialize(max_out, max_in);
    ...
}
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This is a nice approach too. Thanks! –  Pete Darrow Dec 14 '12 at 5:46

Apart from the superfluous assignments to zero, you should probably call initialize_inner from initialize_outer, since it doesn't seem like "outer" fills any purpose without "inner.

This brings up another issue: you should consider using proper, object-oriented program design, with private encapsulation.

inner.h

typedef struct inner_struct;


inner* inner_init (void);
void   inner_free (inner* in); // you need a cleanup function!

// an example of a "setter" function:
void init_set_name (inner* in, const char* name);  

// similar setter and getter functions needed here

inner.c

#include "inner.h"

typedef struct { 
   char* name;
   int   account;
} inner;

inner* inner_init (void) 
{
   inner* in = calloc(1, sizeof (inner));
   if (in == NULL)
   {
     // error_handling
   }

   return in; 
}

void inner_free (inner* in)
{
  // if in->name was allocated dynamically, free it here

  free(in);
}

void init_set_name (inner* in, const char* name)
{
  // assign name to in->name, possibly malloc memory for it
}

outer.h

#include "inner.h"

typedef struct outer_struct;


outer* outer_init (void);
void   outer_free (outer* out);

// setter and getter functions needed here

outer.c

#include "outer.h"

typedef struct 
{
   int count;
   char *company; 
   inner *my_inner;
} outer;


outer* outer_init (void) 
{
   outer* out = calloc(1, sizeof(outer));
   if(out == NULL)
   {
     // error handling
   }

   out->my_inner = inner_init();

   return out;
}

void outer_free (outer* out)
{
  inner_free(out->my_inner);
  free(out);
}

the_application.c

#include "outer.h"

#define MAX_OUT 20

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){

   outer* out_arr [MAX_OUT]

   for(int i=0; i<MAX_OUT; i++)
   {
     out_arr[i] = outer_init();
   }

   ...

   for(int i=0; i<MAX_OUT; i++)
   {
     outer_free(out_arr[i]);
   }
}
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