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I'd like to find the number of character in each line using C program. It would work fine if I'm having single statement in a single line. But, if multiple statements means, it adds a 0 following it. How could I modify my code to achieve what I need? Thanks in advance.

fp=fopen("chumma.c","r");
while((c=getc(fp))!=EOF)
{
    cn++;
    if((c=='\n') || (c==';'))
    {
         if((cn-1)==0)
            em++;
        n++;
        printf("\nNo. of char in line %d : %d\n",n,(cn-1));
        ll[n-1]=cn-1;
        cn=0;
    }
}
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closed as not a real question by paxdiablo, WhozCraig, Alessandro Minoccheri, SWeko, Graviton Dec 19 '12 at 2:50

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
It would be better to use fgets(). –  imreal Dec 14 '12 at 5:28
    
@Nick But, if I use fgets, I can't count the number of characters in that line. I need to calculate that. –  Gomathi Dec 14 '12 at 5:37
1  
use strlen after fgets for counting characters –  Adeel Ahmed Dec 14 '12 at 5:38

5 Answers 5

Try this out, I didn't compile it but it should work.

char buffer[1024];
fp=fopen("chumma.c","r");
while(fgets(buffer, 1024, fp))
{
    n++;
    cn = strlen(buffer);
    printf("\nNo. of char in line %d : %d\n",n,cn);
}
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he doesn’t care about knowing the number of characters in a file –  phaazon Dec 14 '12 at 5:48

With fgets:

char buffer[MAX_BUFFER];

fp=fopen("chumma.c","r");
while (fgets(buffer, MAX_BUFFER, fp)) {
    cn = strnlen(buffer,MAX_BUFFER);
    n++;
    printf("\nNo. of char in line %d : %d\n",n, cn);

}

Something like that.

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But, its not working for multiple statements in a single line. –  Gomathi Dec 14 '12 at 5:53
    
@Gomathi You can use strtok() to tokenize the line with ';' and find length of each token and sum it up. –  CCoder Dec 14 '12 at 5:55
    
why not use fgetpos and lose the linear-time strlen? –  xaxxon Dec 14 '12 at 7:54

The following code should work for you. I have not compiled though.

#define SIZE 1024
char buffer[SIZE];
char * pch;
int cn = 0;

fp=fopen("chumma.c","r");
while (fgets(buffer, SIZE, fp)) 
{
  pch = strtok (buffer,";");
  while (pch != NULL)
  {
    cn += strnlen(pch,SIZE);
    pch = strtok (NULL, ";");
  }
    n++;
    printf("\nNo. of char in line %d : %d\n",n, cn);
  cn = 0;
}

Hope this helps.

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still the same output, Sir. –  Gomathi Dec 14 '12 at 6:35
    
Even now, it didn't consider multiple statements. –  Gomathi Dec 14 '12 at 6:45
    
How about while (strchr(buffer, ';')) cn++ instead? –  user9000 Dec 14 '12 at 7:56
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Though the following code seems a little round about, yet it works. If anyone can simplify it, let me know. Thanks.

while((c=getc(fp))!=EOF)
{
  cn++;
  if(c==';')
  {
    n++;
    printf("\nNo. of char in line %d : %d\n",n,cn);
    ll[n-1]=cn;
    cn=0;
    flag=1;
  }

  if(c=='\n')
  {
    if(flag==1)
    {
      flag=0;
      cn--;
    }

    else{
      if((cn-1)==0)
         em++;
      n++;
      printf("\nNo. of char in line %d : %d\n",n,(cn-1));
      ll[n-1]=cn-1;
      cn=0;
    }
  }
}
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Okay, I really forgot the code but i can still give you a very sound logic which will definately help you. If you have heard about character pointers then no problem.

1) Open the file using fopen. 2) Start a loop till endoffile EOF and fill entire content of file in an array. 3) Create a character pointer with start position of that array and put it inside a loop till '\0' //the ending character of that array. 4) using the value of the pointer in each iteration you can calculate what each element is like (a number or an alphabet --ASCII comparison)

Let me know if that helps

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