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I know this is something very simple, but as a complete Java newbie I'm missing it and someone pointing it out would be infinitely helpful. I've stared at the screen and moved things around and still nothing.

Screenshot: http://i.imgur.com/dwH60.png This is all that comes up when this is run.

fullGUI.java:


import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JRadioButton;
import javax.swing.JTextArea;


public class fullGUI extends JFrame

{
    JFrame frame = new JFrame(); //creates frame

    public fullGUI() // constructor
    {
        //setLayout(new BorderLayout());
        //add(new shipGrid(), BorderLayout.NORTH);
        //add(new shipGrid(), BorderLayout.NORTH);
        add(new JRadioButton("Horizontal"), BorderLayout.WEST);
        add(new JRadioButton("Vertical"), BorderLayout.WEST);
        add(new JTextArea("Instructions to player will go here"), BorderLayout.CENTER);
        frame.setSize(400,600);
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        frame.setTitle("Battleship!");
        frame.pack(); //sets appropriate size for frame
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

}

...called by...

test.java


public class test 
{

     public static void main(String[] args) 
     {

         new fullGUI();


     }


}

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. name classes in Java from a capital letter
  2. FullGUI already extends JFrame, so no need to create another JFrame inside it
  3. call getContentPane.add() to add to JFrame
  4. use SwingUtilities.invokeLater

So overall something like this

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JRadioButton;
import javax.swing.JTextArea;


public class FullGUI extends JFrame

{
    public FullGUI() // constructor
    {
        getContentPane().add(new JRadioButton("Horizontal"), BorderLayout.WEST);
        getContentPane().add(new JRadioButton("Vertical"), BorderLayout.WEST);
        getContentPane().add(new JTextArea("Instructions to player will go here"), BorderLayout.CENTER);
        setSize(400,600);
        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        setTitle("Battleship!");
        pack(); //sets appropriate size for frame
        setVisible(true);
    }

}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

        @Override
        public void run() {
            new FillGU();
        }
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
No need for getContentPane(); add() forwards. Avoid needlessly extending JFrame. If otherwise warranted, invoke setSize() after pack(). –  trashgod Dec 14 '12 at 11:13
    
Thank you very much for the clear corrections! As you can probably tell I'm still at the "beat my head against the wall until I finally get it" stage of learning programming concepts (and Java specifically). –  BILL BONER Dec 14 '12 at 13:49
    
@BILLBONER, I also started SWING just half a year ago. Please, see trashgod's comments and consider accepting my answer. –  Nikolay Kuznetsov Dec 14 '12 at 13:52
    
I also appreciate the class naming convention correction. I get those mixed up. –  BILL BONER Dec 14 '12 at 13:58

Problem is that you are extending JFrame in your class and creating new object "frame". You're adding components such as JRadioButton or JTextArea into fullGUI and other settings of the JFrame are applicable to frame object. It's up to you which approach you're going to choose, but pick one of them. You can extend JFrame and your class will be a child of JFrame which means you can call all public or protected methods from parent class, no need to create new instance of JFrame. Other way is to not extend JFrame and you have to create new JFrame object instead.

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Thank you for the response Toby. It's slow going for me but the explanation helped! –  BILL BONER Dec 14 '12 at 13:53

frame.pack() is causing your JFrame to resize according to its contents.

If you have frame.setSize(400,600), even if you don't add anything to its content pane, the frame will be displayed with size 400x600.

But when you call frame.pack(), the frame will resize. In your case, your frame's content pane does not contain anything. Therefore the pack() method resizes it to only your title bar.

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Yep, I figured the resizing might have something to do with there simply not being content - thanks for confirming. –  BILL BONER Dec 14 '12 at 13:52

As Nikolay Kuznetsov said in earlier answer, you have extended Jframe in fullGUI so no need to create new Jframe in that class, because every instance of FullGUI will be a new frame.

With you code what happened is that you have created a Frame, say frame1 and instance of fullGUI(In main Method) say frame2, these are two different frames. In the Constructor you have added those controls to the frame2 (add()==this.add()) and said frame1.setvisible(true);

Adding controls to one frame and displaying altogether different frame is the reason why you were unable to see anything on output scree though you would have maximized the screen.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Vallabh! Your last note "Adding controls to one frame and displaying altogether different frame is the reason why you were unable to see anything on output scree though you would have maximized the screen." makes this clearer to me, and also explains why an earlier version of this code was spitting out mulitple windows. –  BILL BONER Dec 14 '12 at 13:56
    
I am glad that helped you. :-) –  Vallabh Patade Dec 17 '12 at 8:35

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