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My problem is simple. I want to output UTF-8 with my Perl script. This code is not working.

use utf8;
open(TROIS,">utf8.out.2.txt");
binmode(TROIS, ":utf8");
print TROIS "Hello\n";         

The output file is not in UTF-8. (My file script is coded in UTF-8) But if I insert an accentuated character in my print, then it's working and my output file is in UTF-8. Example:

print TROIS "é\n";

I use ActivePerl 5.10 under Windows. What might be the problem?

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12  
You're writing nothing but ASCII characters with Hello\n. Fortunately ASCII is still perfectly valid UTF-8. However, auto detection by editors will most likely not show UTF-8 as they encoding because they don't have anything to judge the file content's encoding by. I guess you simply don't know how file encodings work. –  Moritz Bunkus Dec 14 '12 at 8:05
    
Thank you for your explanation. –  user1903343 Dec 14 '12 at 8:18
2  
@Moritz: Please post your explanation as an answer. user1903343 should then mark it as accepted, so that this question no longer shows up as "unresolved". –  tripleee Dec 14 '12 at 8:34
    
Quite true. Did that with some more information. –  Moritz Bunkus Dec 14 '12 at 9:15

2 Answers 2

You're writing nothing but ASCII characters with Hello\n. Fortunately ASCII is still perfectly valid UTF-8. However, auto detection by editors will most likely not show UTF-8 as the encoding because they don't have anything to judge the file content's encoding by. I guess you simply don't know how file encodings work.

A file's encoding is a property that in general is not stored in a file or externally alongside a file. A lot of editors simply assume a certain encoding based on the operating system they run on or the environment settings (system language), or they include some kind of semi-intelligent auto-detection (which may still fail because file encodings cannot be auto-detected unambiguously). That's why you have to tell Perl that a file is encoded in UTF-8 when you read it with binmode or the corresponding I/O layer.

Now there is one way of marking a text file's encoding if said encoding is one of the UTF family (UTF-8, UTF-16 LE and BE, UTF-32 LE and BE) . That way is called the BOM (byte order mark). However, producing files with a BOM came from a time when UTF-8 had not been spread as widely as it is today. It usually poses more and different problems than it solves, especially due to editors and applications in general not supporting BOMs at all. Therefore BOMs should probably be avoided nowadays.

There are exceptions, of course, in which the file format contains certain instructions that tell the file's encoding. XML comes to mind with its DOCTYPE declaration. However, even for such files you will have to recognize if a file is encoded in a multi-byte encoding that always uses at least two bytes per character (UTF-16/UTF-32) or not in order to parse the DOCTYPE declaration in the first place. It's simply not simple ;)

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Did you try switch C (capitalized C) for invoking perl?

#!/usr/bin/perl -w -Cio

from man perlrun:

   -C [number/list]
        The "-C" flag controls some of the Perl Unicode features.

        As of 5.8.1, the "-C" can be followed either by a number or a list of option
        letters.  The letters, their numeric values, and effects are as follows;
        listing the letters is equal to summing the numbers.

            I     1   STDIN is assumed to be in UTF-8
            O     2   STDOUT will be in UTF-8
            E     4   STDERR will be in UTF-8
            S     7   I + O + E
            i     8   UTF-8 is the default PerlIO layer for input streams
            o    16   UTF-8 is the default PerlIO layer for output streams
            D    24   i + o
            A    32   the @ARGV elements are expected to be strings encoded
                      in UTF-8
            L    64   normally the "IOEioA" are unconditional,
                      the L makes them conditional on the locale environment
                      variables (the LC_ALL, LC_TYPE, and LANG, in the order
                      of decreasing precedence) -- if the variables indicate
                      UTF-8, then the selected "IOEioA" are in effect
            a   256   Set ${^UTF8CACHE} to -1, to run the UTF-8 caching code in
                      debugging mode.
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