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I am curious about an improved way to dynamically delete properties from a javascript object based on wildcards. Firstly, suppose I have the following object:

object =
{
    checkbox_description_1 : 'Chatoyant',
    checkbox_description_2 : 'Desultory',
    random_property : 'Firefly is a great program',
    checkbox_mood_1 : 'Efflorescent',
    checkbox_description_3 : 'Ephemeral'
}

Task

Now, the end result is to have removed all properties under the guise of 'checkbox_description' and leave the rest of the object intact as shown:

object =
{
    random_property : 'Firefly is a great program',
    checkbox_mood_1 : 'Efflorescent',
}

My solution

At present my solution involves jquery and the following code:

var strKeyToDelete = 'checkbox_description'

/* Start looping through the object */
$.each(object, function(strKey, strValue) {

    /* Check if the key starts with the wildcard key to delete */
    if(this.match("^"+strKey) == strKeyToDelete) {

        /* Kill... */
        delete object[strKey];
    };
});

Issue

Something about this seems very inelegant to me and if the object were to be of reasonable size very process intensive. Is there a better way of performing this operation?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is the bare minimum required:

function deleteFromObject(keyPart, obj){
    for (var k in obj){          // Loop through the object
        if(~k.indexOf(keyPart)){ // If the current key contains the string we're looking for
            delete obj[k];       // Delete obj[key];
        }
    }
}

var myObject = {
    checkbox_description_1 : 'Chatoyant',
    checkbox_description_2 : 'Desultory',
    random_property : 'Firefly is a great program',
    checkbox_mood_1 : 'Efflorescent',
    checkbox_description_3 : 'Ephemeral'
};
deleteFromObject('checkbox_description', myObject);
console.log(myObject);
// myObject is now: {random_property: "Firefly is a great program", checkbox_mood_1: "Efflorescent"};

So that's pretty close to the jQuery function you have.
(Though a little faster, considering it doesn't use jQuery, and indexOf instead of match)

So, what's with the ~ before indexOf?

indexOf returns a integer value: -1 if the string is not found, and a index, starting from 0, if it is found. (So always a positive integer if found)
~ is a bitwise NOT, that inverts this output. As it happens to be, the inverted output of indexOf is just what we need to indicate "found" or "not found".

~-1 becomes 0, a false-ish value.
~x, where x is 0 or postitive, becomes -(x+1), a true-ish value.

This way, ~string.indexOf('needle') acts like string.contains('needle'), a function that we don't have in JavaScript.

Additionally, you could add a double boolean not (!!) in front of the ~, to convert the true-ish or false-ish output to a real true / false, but that's not necessary in JavaScript.
Functionally, ~string.indexOf('needle') and !!~string.indexOf('needle') are equal.


In case you specifically need the key to begin with the needle, replace the:

~k.indexOf(keyPart)

With:

k.indexOf(keyPart) === 0
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1  
Might be worth explaining what the ~ does in there - its not a commonly seen operator in js. –  Jamiec Dec 14 '12 at 8:57
1  
it's bitwise NOT. –  Jonathan de M. Dec 14 '12 at 8:58
    
What if keypart is at index 0? –  Jonathan de M. Dec 14 '12 at 8:59
    
@Jamiec: I'm on it, editing. –  Cerbrus Dec 14 '12 at 9:00
1  
Didn't the OP want the key to begin with the wildcard string, instead of to contain it? –  Bergi Dec 14 '12 at 11:27

You can use Javascript StartsWith:

function deleteFromObject(keyToDelete, obj) {
    var l = keyToDelete.length;
    for (var key in obj)
        if (key.substr(0, l) == keyToDelete) // key begins with the keyToDelete
            delete obj[key];
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have to wonder if indexOf and substr use the same algorithm behind the scenes, except indexOf searches at every index, not just the one specified with substr. Which would make this much more efficient for non-matches –  Ian Dec 14 '12 at 15:41
    
Yes, that's the point of using substr :-) I don't think you can compare the algorithms, as substr does not search. Of course, an even better implementation would not extract the whole substr, but compare character for character so it can break early. –  Bergi Dec 14 '12 at 15:51
    
Right, I guess I meant that I wonder if indexOf uses substr (or an algorithm just like it) over and over again, from index 0 to length-1 (and maybe short-circuits after the certain point where it isn't necessary to do the search anymore). Like hypothetically if there were a second parameter for indexOf that said at what index to stop searching...and if you passed it 1, it would be "identical" to the use of substr in this example of "starting with". I'm not sure if comparing character for character would necessarily be better in terms of work to do, but makes more sense at least –  Ian Dec 14 '12 at 21:53
    
indexOf has a second parameter that says where to start searching. And yes, from there it is compared character by character internally; a soon as it does not match it tries from next index. –  Bergi Dec 15 '12 at 18:46
    
I forgot about the actual second parameter! Well then I meant a third parameter! Anyways, it was hypothetical. I think you get it. But nevermind :) –  Ian Dec 15 '12 at 20:57

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