Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Please consider the following simple code and then I will ask my question.

public static void Save(XmlDocument saveBundle)
    {
        ThreadStart threadStart = delegate
        {
            SaveToDatabase(saveBundle);
        };

        new Thread(threadStart).Start();            
    }

The issue with using threads in Visual Studio (2005) is you can't walk through them easily (I believe there is a way to switch threads which I have not looked into as I'm hoping there is an easier way).

So, in live, my code is more complex that then example above and we use a new thread as it's time critical but the principal is the same. Most importantly, it is not time critical in test!

At the moment, I will probably do something like using the #if debug but it just feels wrong to do so - Am I using the #if in the correct way here or is there a better way to resolve this?

public static void Save(XmlDocument saveBundle)
    {

   #if debug
      {
        SaveToDatabase(parameters);
        }
   #else
        {
            ThreadStart threadStart = delegate
            {
                SaveToDatabase(parameters);
            };

            new Thread(threadStart).Start();
        }
   #endif
      }
    }

Although I'm stuck on .NET 2.0 I am interested in any version from .NET 20. onwards (I'm sure one day I'll leave the Jurassic period and join everyone else)

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If what you truly want to do is not use the threading in your debug build - this is the correct way to do it and probably the quickest and most capable way of doing it as well. It may look a bit ugly but the alternative are just more bools, configurations and other work arounds.

If you're interested in debugging the thread directly (this is important perhaps if concurrency is an issue! You should always test as close to the production environment as possible) then you can simply go (Debug -> Windows -> Threads) and then right click the thread you would like to debug and "Switch to Thread".

share|improve this answer

I would say that your original code is lacking an important feature; some sort of mechanism of reporting back when the operation has completed (or failed):

public static void Save(XmlDocument saveBundle, Action<Exception> completedCallback)
{
    ThreadStart threadStart = delegate
    {
        try
        {            
            SaveToDatabase(saveBundle);
            completedCallback(null);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            completedCallback(ex);
        }
    };

    new Thread(threadStart).Start();            
}

That way, you can use some sort of synchronization method to orchestrate your unit-test:

Exception actualException = null;
using (AutoResetEvent waitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(false))
{

    instance.Save(xmlDocument, ex =>
    {
        actualException = ex;
        waitHandle.Set();
    });
    waitHandle.WaitOne();
}

Assert.IsNull(actualException);
share|improve this answer

Maybe You could put this threading code into a separate method and substitute that method when testing.

virtual void SaveToDBInSeparateThread(...)
{
    ThreadStart threadStart = delegate
    {
        ...
    };

    new Thread(threadStart).Start();  
}

You could then instead of returning void return the thread run or something similar.

Or You can add an input parameter to Your method like below:

virtual void SaveToDB(bool inSeparateThread)
{
    if(inSeparateThread)
    {
      ThreadStart threadStart = delegate
      {
        ...
      };

      new Thread(threadStart).Start();  
    }
    ...
}

Or You can provide some kind of DatabaseSavingContext:

interface IDBSaveContext
{
    public void SaveToDB(...)
}

And use different implementation (threaded, non-threaded) of this interface depending on execution type.

share|improve this answer
    
The bool is nearly identical to the conditional - and adds extra over-head by just a bit. –  Vaughan Hilts Dec 14 '12 at 9:11
    
Yes, that's true. I just suggested such option, because author of the question feels uncomfortable with preprocessor conditional. –  Grzegorz Sławecki Dec 14 '12 at 9:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.