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I am creating a very large PHP MVC-based site that will have a large library of php classes, javascripts, and many css files (not to mention a large amount of files for the MVC).

For the first time ever, I am actually taking the time to plan out a clean and organized directory structure.

What directory structures do you typically use, and which will be easiest to manuever when there are thousands of files?

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This is just a thought. Have you considered using a PHP MVC framework that already exists, such as CakePHP? I understand there may be a learning curve, but it might be worthwhile to consider the benefits of an open source, popular framework. I've built and maintained my own code for years, but found that it is more scalable to use a third party framework, especially for large sites. You may just find that it will save you time in the long run, and you'll have valuable skills for future outsourcing projects. –  Dooltaz Sep 7 '09 at 5:09
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i actually have thought of that...and i might acutally use one in the end...but i just have to be able to do it myself before i can move on:) its a neurotic thing ha –  johnnietheblack Sep 7 '09 at 5:34
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7 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is my setup. It's worked great for me for small - very large projects (including a social network).
These folders would all live within my main application folder:

  • config - contains custom PHP config files
  • css - contains the project's CSS files
  • helpers - contains 'helper' files (each file is a collection of functions)
  • images - contains the project's images
  • js - contains the project's Javascript files
  • lib - contains PHP classes specific to the project
  • modules - My MVC framework allows packaging site sections as modules
    • blog - An example module
      • controllers - contains the controllers for the module
      • models - contains the models for the module
      • views - contains the views for the module

  • views - contains views that should be globally accessible (page header, footer, etc)

All the directories could obviously contain sub-folders that would further organize your files. For example, the 'css' folder could have sub-folders named 'web' and 'mobile'. The 'images' folder could contain a 'user_uploaded' folder which could then contain`'profile'. And of course you can add folders as you see fit, in one project I have a folder called 'uploaders' which just contains stand-alone upload scripts.

I also use convenience methods which help construct the filenames of what I want to load. For example, my loadView() will look for the view file in the current module directory, or if you pass an optional $module argument, it will look specifically within that module's folder.

I hope this helps.

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This means all php code, configuration, etc will be visible to everyone unless you do some server magic with something like .htaccess –  OIS Feb 10 '10 at 17:45
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OIS is correct. In this setup, if someone knew the file name, they could call it from the browser. I posted this answer before switching to Symfony (which hides all background files) and I definitely recommend moving all non-public files outside of public web access. –  Arms Feb 10 '10 at 18:21
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You should have one directory as web root, where only files you want exposed to the whole internet should reside.

project/
 web/
  index.php
  css/
  js/
  images/
 config/
 lib/
  • web/ is the root shown to visitors
  • lib/ is here the library folder, and where autoload look for files.

You can add more subfolders to project/ like controller, modules, view, helper, etc. This depeds on your framework.

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Clean and simple but lacks two important folders: project/tests/ and project/class/ (so that the lib folder can be used for third party libraries). May be you people have other suggestions for the thrid parties structure? –  Wernight Feb 3 '10 at 12:50
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For core files which are included: approot/inc/

For data access functions and classes are in: approot/dao/

For javascripts: approot/scripts/

For CSS: approot/styles/

For images: approot/img/

For static content (normally for user profile pictures or uploaded images): approot/static/

For caches: approot/caches/

For templates or View files: approot/templates/

All pages file: approot/

Structure from Samstyle PHP Framework


The answer I posted here was from 2009. Over the years more standards were published, including PSR-0 which covers the topic on folder structure. I also have a new (and I feel that it's better) folder structure with Packfire Framework.

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why did this one get voted down? –  johnnietheblack Sep 7 '09 at 4:33
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no idea. would love to find out from voter as well. –  mauris Sep 7 '09 at 4:35
    
@mauris do you still use this structure? –  Sarah James Feb 25 at 13:47
    
@Sarah nope No longer. github.com/packfire/config or packages in Packfire are created by me and none of them uses this structure anymore. –  mauris Feb 26 at 0:18
    
@mauris thanks for getting back to me. I struggle a bit in structuring my folders and I was very interested in seeing how professional developers do it. My folders are everywhere and this forces me to do alot of url rewrite rules. I downloaded the folder but understand what to be looking for. –  Sarah James Feb 26 at 10:36
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In my experience, you can never plan for this. You can try to follow what frameworks do, but I find I never quite fit exactly into their mold.

I recommend to just keep a good rule of thumb for 20 files in a directory maximum. If you find you need more, just create a few sub directories and move common components in there.

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cool idea on learning from frameworks...but what are some good ones, and where do i find their structures? thanks! –  johnnietheblack Sep 7 '09 at 4:40
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I use codeigniter for small and big projects. It's MVC feature is moderately good.

  • codeIgniter\system\application\config : contain all kind of configuration files like DB,Payment gateway, ftp config, routes and ...
  • codeIgniter\system\application\models: contain all kinds of database classes, you should create sub folders according to your need, I used customers, mailData, paymentModel, report, web-service and ....
  • codeIgniter\system\application\views: contain all kinds of files that will work as output for clients, you should think of reuse these files if possible. Like the models you had to create sub folder like administration, reports, email, email_template .....
  • codeIgniter\system\application\controllers : this is the most important part. This will help to create SEO url, so you should be more careful about sub folders this time. You can create like administration, products, reports, orders..... and consider a good name for the functions of the controller class.

These were for the PHP/HTML file.

Now about the other files:

  • codeIgniter\images: for the images
  • codeIgniter\scripts: for the Java scripts and their framework
  • codeIgniter\styles: for the CSS
  • codeIgniter\uploads: for the uploaded files, if you don't want to put files in the DB

For the detail see codeIgniter framework in detail.

Here "codeIgniter\" is the approot

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Have a look at symfony 1.4 or symfony 2 dir structure. Choose what's most intuitive to you.

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I believe this depends on how large the project will become. This is what I used mostly:

project/
  index.php
  img/
  css/
  js/
  views/
  functions/

As long as all the project files are organised...

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