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I have a - for me unknown - issue and I don't know what's the logic/cause behind it. When I try to insert a record in a table I get a DB2 error saying:

[SQL0803] Duplicate key value specified: A unique index or unique constraint *N in *N
exists over one or more columns of table TABLEXXX in SCHEMAYYY. The operation cannot 
be performed because one or more values would have produced a duplicate key in 
the unique index or constraint.

Which is a quite clear message to me. But actually there would be no duplicate key if I inserted my new record seeing what records are already in there. When I do a SELECT COUNT(*) from SCHEMAYYY.TABLEXXX and then try to insert the record it works flawlessly.

How can it be that when performing the SELECT COUNT(*) I can suddenly insert the records? Is there some sort of index associated with it which might give issues because it is out of sync? I didn't design the data model, so I don't have deep knowledge of the system yet.

The original DB2 SQL is:

--  Generate SQL 
--  Version:                    V6R1M0 080215 
--  Generated on:               19/12/12 10:28:39 
--  Relational Database:        S656C89D 
--  Standards Option:           DB2 for i 
CREATE TABLE TZVDB.PRODUCTCOSTS ( 
    ID INTEGER GENERATED BY DEFAULT AS IDENTITY ( 
START WITH 1 INCREMENT BY 1 
MINVALUE 1 MAXVALUE 2147483647 
NO CYCLE NO ORDER 
CACHE 20 ) 
, 
PRODUCT_ID INTEGER DEFAULT NULL , 
STARTPRICE DECIMAL(7, 2) DEFAULT NULL , 
FROMDATE TIMESTAMP DEFAULT NULL , 
TILLDATE TIMESTAMP DEFAULT NULL , 
CONSTRAINT TZVDB.PRODUCTCOSTS_PK PRIMARY KEY( ID ) ) ; 

ALTER TABLE TZVDB.PRODUCTCOSTS 
ADD CONSTRAINT TZVDB.PRODCSTS_PRDCT_FK 
FOREIGN KEY( PRODUCT_ID ) 
REFERENCES TZVDB.PRODUCT ( ID ) 
ON DELETE RESTRICT 
ON UPDATE NO ACTION;
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1  
Can you show us the table definition of TABLEXXX? That should show the index/unique constraints you have. Also, can you show the insert statement? –  dan1111 Dec 14 '12 at 10:39
1  
Probably something weird in your definitions, but yes, it's possible that you have a high level of optimization, with your table statistics out-of-date. Although I thought that usually unique constraints were only enforced after the INSERT was attempted... –  Clockwork-Muse Dec 14 '12 at 18:19
    
Added the generated SQL from the table in the original posting. –  Tjeerd Dec 19 '12 at 9:54
    
Did you find a solution? Is this still happening? –  WarrenT Jan 22 at 12:44

2 Answers 2

I'd like to see the statements...but since this question is a year old...I won't old my breath.

I'm thinking the problem may be the GENERATED BY DEFAULT

And instead of passing NULL for the identity column, you're accidentally passing zero or some other duplicate value the first time around.

Either always pass NULL, pass a non-duplicate value or switch to GENERATED ALWAYS

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Yes, I agree. I don't know why I didn't see that back then, staring me right in the face. –  WarrenT Feb 2 at 22:15

Look at preceding messages in the joblog for specifics as to what caused this. I don't understand how the INSERT can suddenly work after the COUNT(*). Please let us know what you find.

Since it shows *N (ie n/a) as the name of the index or constraing, this suggests to me that is is not a standard DB2 object, and therefore may be a "logical file" [LF] defined with DDS rather than SQL, with a key structure different than what you were doing your COUNT(*) on.

Your shop may have better tools do view keys on dependent files, but the method below will work anywhere.

If your table might not be the actual "physical file", check this using Display File Description, DSPFD TZVDB.PRODUCTCOSTS, in a 5250 ("green screen") session.

Use the Display Database Relations command, DSPDBR TZVDB.PRODUCTCOSTS, to find what files are defined over your table. You can then DSPFD on each of these files to see the definition of the index key. Also check there that each of these indexes is maintained *IMMED, rather than *REBUILD or *DELAY. (A wild longshot guess as to a remotely possible cause of your strange anomaly.)

You will find the DB2 for i message finder here in the IBM i 7.1 Information Center or other releases

share|improve this answer
    
Unique indexes are always *IMMED. –  Charles Jan 26 at 1:51

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