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Is it bad practice to change my getter method like version 2 in my class.

Version 1:

 public String getMyValue(){
     return this.myValue
 }

Version 2:

 public String getMyValue(){

    if(this.myValue == null || this.myValue.isEmpty()){
       this.myValue = "N/A";
    }

    return this.myValue;
 }
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4  
imho it's ok if this side effect is clearly documented in the docs –  jlordo Dec 14 '12 at 9:44
2  
I think this is bad because it seems like you are mixing your presenting with your data model. What happens when your app need to be translated to a different language?. –  MTilsted Dec 14 '12 at 9:53
7  
I'm not found of your change, but generally I think changing a getter is OK. After all, the getter is an abstraction that enables us to change the internal behavior w/o breaking other code. –  Matsemann Dec 14 '12 at 12:09
2  
it's also not thread safe –  irreputable Dec 14 '12 at 15:12
1  
Shouldn't the question title read, Is it bad practice for a getter to change an object's member's value?, as it is it sounds like you are asking whether it's bad for a getter's internal implementation to change, to which I believe the answer is no, it's ok to change it. –  vikki Dec 15 '12 at 9:48
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14 Answers

up vote 112 down vote accepted

I think it is actually quite a bad practice if your getter methods change the internal state of the object.

To achieve the same I would suggest just returning the "N/A".

  • Generally speaking this internal field might be used in other places (internally) for which you don't need to use the getter method. So in the end, the call to foo.getMyValue() could actually change the behaviour of foo.

Alternatively, the translation from null to "N/A" could be done in the setter, i.e. the internal value could be set to "N/A" if null is passed.


A general remark:
I would only add states such as "N/A" if they are expected by some API or other instance relying on your code. If that is not the case you should rely on the standard null types that are available to you in your programming language.

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39  
Just a note: I feel that getters can change the internal state of an object in the case of lazy-loading, where you specifically want to load data only when the getter gets called. –  MarvinLabs Dec 14 '12 at 10:50
5  
Fair enough, that is a valid use-case. But the situation described by OP could lead to horrible side-effects. –  fgysin Dec 14 '12 at 12:12
4  
+1 return "N/A" instead of changing the value –  jhocking Dec 14 '12 at 14:15
3  
There is nothing more annoying than dealing with a Property that changes state on the getter, and having the state change while debugging every time some component of the debugger access it. –  Chuu Dec 14 '12 at 16:14
5  
I don't think there's any issue with changing the internal state of an object in a getter. The internal state of an object is the class author's business. As a user of the class, you are not supposed to know (or care) what's happening internally, as long as the external interface is consistent. So whether he sets the value in the setter or, lazily, in the getter, this is completely valid. What's important is that the getter consistently returns N/A for null or empty values. –  this.lau_ Dec 14 '12 at 16:29
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In my opinion, unless you are doing lazy-loading (which you are not in that case), getters should not change the value. So I would either:

Put the change in the setter

public void setMyValue(String value) {
    if(value == null || value.isEmpty()){
        this.myValue = "N/A";
    } else {
        this.myValue = value;
    }
}

Or make the getter return a default value if value not set properly:

public String getMyValue() {
    if(this.myvalue == null || this.myvalue.isEmpty()){
        return "N/A";
    }    
    return this.myValue;
}

In the case of lazy-loading, where I would say that changing your members in a getter is fine, you would do something like:

public String getMyValue() {
    if (this.myvalue == null) {
        this.myvalue = loadMyValue();
    }    
    return this.myValue;
}
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Why would you call your lazy loading method get...()? Calling it something like load...() seems more appropriate, doesn't it? –  Lucas Hoepner Dec 19 '12 at 14:39
    
Because the getter returns the value directly unless it has never been loaded before (hence the call to loadMyValue inside the getter). Calling the getter loadMyValue would imply (according to me) that it loads the value no matter what. –  MarvinLabs Dec 19 '12 at 14:48
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Yes. it's a bad practice.

Why ?

When the value is imported into object (in constructor, or setter method), those value will be validated, not validate until getter method has been called. And, if someone is careful, they will create an entire private validate method for this value too.

private boolean validateThisValue(String a) {
   // return true or false
   // in this example will be
   if(this.myvalue == null || this.myvalue.isEmpty()){
       return false;
   }
   else {
       return true;
   }
}

public void setThisValue(String a) {
    if (validateThisValue(a)) {
        this.myValue = a;
    } 
    else {
        // do something else
        // in this example will be
        this.myValue = "N/A";
    }
}

And, in getter method, never ever change the state of value. I have worked on some project, and the getter often must be set to const : this method cannot change internal state.

At least, if you not want to this complicate thing, in getter method, you should return "N/A" rather than change internal state, set myValue to "N/A".

Hope this help :)

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3  
I disagree with never changing a value in a setter. The entire purpose of using getter/setters is to abstract internal and external implementations. Person.setHeightInCentimeters(int value), Person.setHeightInMeters(double value), and Person.setHeightInFeetAndInches(int feet, int inches) should all share a single internal representation, meaning that at least two of them will be storing something other than the input value(s). –  Dan Neely Dec 14 '12 at 14:00
    
ah. i'm sorry so much :( i type mismatch, never change something in getter. not setter. as you see in my code, i have change internal state of setter. i have edited. i'm sorry so much. –  hqt Dec 14 '12 at 15:25
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No. You're doing two things here. Getting and setting.

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I usually define a specific getter.

Never alter original getter:

 public String getMyValue(){
     return this.myValue
 }

And create an specific getter:

public String getMyValueFormatted(){

    if(this.myvalue == null || this.myvalue.isEmpty()){
       return "N/A";
    }else{
       return this.myValue;
    }
 }
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How do you know which one to call when? –  Abhishek Mehta Dec 18 '12 at 22:17
    
The intent of the second method is for the purpose of display to user. –  Rodrigo Dec 19 '12 at 12:14
    
So then the 1st one should not be a public? –  Abhishek Mehta Dec 19 '12 at 21:36
    
No. Both are public. Uses first to get raw value. When needs formatted value, use the second one. Simple, you don't need complicate getter/setter methods. –  Rodrigo Dec 20 '12 at 11:45
1  
It would be confusing for a new developer who is calling the API. 1st approach: Rename 1st public method as getMyValueOriginal and 2nd method as getMyValueFormatted. –  Abhishek Mehta Dec 21 '12 at 20:59
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I think it's better to initialize this.myValue = "N/A". And subsequent calls to setMyValue should modify the this.myValue according to your business conditions.
The getMyValue shouldn't modify in any way this.myValue. If your needs are to return a certain value, you should return that value (like "N/A") and not alter this.myValue . Getters must not modify member's value.

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Do what ever you like. After all getters and setters are just another public methods. You could use any other names.

But if you use frameworks like Spring, you are bound to use those standard names and you should never put your custom codes inside them.

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absolutely yes, it's a bad pratice.

Imagine you communicate accross network with a third party (remoting, COM, ...), this will increase the round-trip and then hit application performance.

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A setter could modify as part of validation, but a getter should return the value and let the validation be done by the caller. If you do validate, then how should be documented.

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I would change better the setter method so, if the value is null or empty, the N/A is assigned to the attribute. So, if you use the attribute in other methods inside the class (v.g. toString()) you will have the intended value there.

Alternatively, change the setter method to launch an exception when the value being set is not right, so the programmer is forced to improve its handling prior to setting the value.

Other than that, it is ok.

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I do feel this is a bad practice unless and until you explain the reason why it is so necessary for you modify the object inside the getter method instead of doing it inside the setter method.
Do you feel this cannot be done for some reason? Could you please elaborate?

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This actually highly depends on the contract you want to enforce with your get()-method. According to design-by-contract conventions the caller has to make sure that the preconditions are met (which means doing a validation in a setter method often is actually bad design) and the callee (I do not know if that's the correct english term for that, i.e., the called one) makes sure that the post conditions are met.

If you define your contract so that the get()-method is not allowed to change the object then you are breaking your own contract. Think about implementing a method like

public isValid() {
    return (this.myvalue == null || this.myvalue.isEmpty());
}

Advantage of this approach is that you do not have to check wether the return of your get() is "N/A" or something else. This also can be called before calling set() to validate that you do not insert illegal values into your object.

If you want to set a default value you should do that during initialization.

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You can use some value holder for this purpose. Like Optional class in guava library.

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State changes in getters should be a hanging offence. It means that client code must be careful about the order in which it accesses getters and setters and to do this it must have knowledge of the implementation. You should be able to call the getters in any order and still get the same results. A related problem occurs when the setter modifies the incoming value depending on the current state of the object.

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