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Is it possible to throw an exception outside a try block? If I'm not mistaken in Java you can declare that a function throws an exception and then just throw it up the function chain, with no try/catch inside the function. Any similar method in nodeJS?

Also, I noticed that if I try to throw an exception from a callback function to where It was called in my code, I can't do it. I understand it can be solved using domains, which I still don't know. Am I right?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Node.js is a framework based on Google V8 JavaScript, just another ECMAScript implementation. Get your basics right first. – PointedEars Dec 14 '12 at 10:12
    
Why do you think I don't already know it? There are some differences so I thought I'll put it in the topic. Also - why does it bother you? – Yotam Dec 14 '12 at 10:17
    
Right, I should not have corrected your misconception and given you a hint where to look. Sorry to have bothered you. – PointedEars Dec 14 '12 at 10:22

In javascript you can throw exception from Anywhere:

Read MDN:throw

For better understanding of error handling, see and search "error constructor"

share|improve this answer
    
There is no "javascript". The documentation of one ECMAScript implementation (here: Mozilla JavaScript) is usually not helpful in solving a problem with another one (here: Google V8 JavaScript). – PointedEars Dec 14 '12 at 10:19
    
@PointedEars: Have you checked the links? Are you sure that the pointed documents don't help the OP in understanding error handling? OP is interested in understanding error handling in Javascript (colloquial) – closure Dec 14 '12 at 10:35
    
The OP is asking about node.js and need to get their basics right first. The question should have never been asked as it is. – PointedEars Dec 14 '12 at 10:38

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