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I have setup two entry boxes, and the goal is to press a button and apply some type of math to the input numbers using a function outside of the scope. (I have left out the packing and framing code since I don't think it is relative to the problem.)

class class1:
    def __init__(self):
        self.entry1= tkinter.Entry(self.uframe, width=10)
        self.entry2= tkinter.Entry(self.uframe, width=10)

        self.calcButton = tkinter.Button(self.frame, text="Submit", command = self.doMathFunction)

def doMathFunction():
    #what do I put here that allows me to either run a .get on self.entry1 and 2

I thought about making the entries global in scope, but that will prevent me from running a get on them? I think there is a way to have an event run a get when the enduser puts in numbers into the Entry box, since it is mentioned in the ktinker documentation as "needing more explanation." I am not really sure what the best way of doing this is, and my research comes back with conflicting answers.

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

Have your button call a method on the class, and have that method call doMathFUnction, passing it the values. Doing it this way means that your doMathFunc function doesn't need to know anything about the inner workings of the GUI.

class class1:
    def __init__(self):
        ...
        self.calcButton = tkinter.Button(..., command=self.doCalc)

    def doCalc(self):
        a = self.entry1.get()
        b = self.entty2.get()
        doMathFunction(a,b)
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If doMathFunction has to be out of scope, you can use a lambda statement and add variables to your doMathFunction.

class class1:
    def __init__(self):
        self.entry1= tkinter.Entry(self.uframe, width=10)
        self.entry2= tkinter.Entry(self.uframe, width=10)

        self.calcButton = tkinter.Button(self.frame, text="Submit", command = \
             lambda e1 = self.entry1.get(), e2 = self.entry2.get(): doMathFunction(e1,e2))

def doMathFunction(e1, e2):
    print(e1*e2) # Or whatever you were going to do

Normally, using a function in a command statement acts like a variable declaration, the function is executed and the return statement is assigned to the variable. However, with lambda, the function behind it is only executed on-call.

So when calcButton gets pushed and calls its command statement, the lambda "function" (with e1 and e2) is executed. It's like creating a middleman function to handle the call.

class class1:
    def __init__(self):
        self.entry1= tkinter.Entry(self.uframe, width=10)
        self.entry2= tkinter.Entry(self.uframe, width=10)

        self.calcButton = tkinter.Button(..., command = self.middleman)

    def middleman(self):
        e1 = self.entry1.get()
        e2 = self.entry2.get()
        doMathFunction(e1, e2)

def doMathFunction(e1, e2):
    print(e1*e2) # Or whatever you were going to do
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