Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am actually writing a library class which could be used by multiple classes. I am simplying the example so as to make a point. Lets say I have three classes: A, B and C:

public class B
{
  public static string B_Method()
  {
    string bstr = String.Empty;

    try
       {


        //Do Something

       }

    catch
        {

        //Do Something

        }

  return bstr;

}

B is the library class that I am writing. Now there are lets say two other classes say A and C:

public class A
{
  public void A_Method()
  {
   string astr = B.B_Method();
  }

}

public class C
{
 public void C_Method()
  {
   string cstr = B.B_Method();
  }

}

The question is regarding the exception handling. I want the respective method of the two classes A and B to handle the exception occuring in B_Method in their own different ways.

I looked for framework design pattern, but felt that was not useful.

share|improve this question
1  
Why is B catching the exception at all if you want to let the caller deal with it? –  Paolo Dec 14 '12 at 11:20
    
Then why don't you simply let the exception propagate from B_Method, and let the callers do the try/catch? –  JB Nizet Dec 14 '12 at 11:22
    
Lets say, B_method is sending a request to a server and getting a response. The same response it is sending back to the callers. IF I don't catch exception while sending the request, won't the execution stop there? –  futurenext110 Dec 14 '12 at 11:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The approach that I usually follow is this:

  • If my method can do something useful with the exception, I catch it and do that.
  • If not, I don't catch it and leave it up to calling code to deal with it.

The only places where I would put a "catch all" block, is at entry points in UI code (such as event handlers for button clicks and such), since not catching exceptions there might take the process down.

This also means that exception clauses should catch the specific exceptions that you can handle.

One approach that I sometimes see is to catch the exception, wrap it in a new exception type and throw that. While that offers you some traceability, I also feel that it removes some options in the exception handling in calling code, such as having specific catch clauses for different scenarios. In these cases you will instead need to have if-clauses inspecting the inner exception with is less readable in my eyes.

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly. Exceptions should rarely be catched. Only when you know how to handle those. They aren't called exceptions for no reason –  KroaX Dec 14 '12 at 11:28

B is the library class that I am writing.

If you have control over B code, B should rethrow the exception caught:

public class B
{
    public static string B_Method()
    {
        string bstr = String.Empty;

        try
        {
            // Do Something
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            // Do Something (Log the exception details)
            throw;
        }

        return bstr;
    }
}

I want the respective method of the two classes A and B to handle the exception occuring in B_Method in their own different ways.

Now, B can log the exception and A and C can handle the rethrown exception is their own way.

share|improve this answer
    
It's a very bad practice to rethrow exception this way. Call throw; with full stack or create new custom exception. –  Sergio Rykov Dec 14 '12 at 11:42

remove the try and catch block from class b

public static string B_Method()throws Exception{
    boolean success=compute();
    if(!success){
       throw new Exception("an error occured");
     }
} 
private static boolean compute(){
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer

You can rethrow or just let throw the exception in B_Method and catch it in A and C classes.

public class A
{
  public void A_Method()
  {
   try
   {
     string astr = B.B_Method();
   }
  catch(Exception ex)
  {
    //Handle it in A way
  }

}

public class C
{
 public void C_Method()
  {
   try
   {
     string astr = B.B_Method();
   }
  catch(Exception ex)
  {
    //Handle it in C way
  }
}

I think Design Patterns don't really apply here.. It's just OO programming.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.