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I need a final review and some tips about a function I wrote.

  public static Integer max(Integer... pNumber) {
    Integer lResult = null;
    for (Integer lNumber : pNumber) {
      if (lResult == null || (null != lNumber && lNumber > lResult)) {
        lResult = lNumber;
      }
    }
    return lResult;
  }

I am not realy sure if my code is elegant. null parameters as well as a null result is possible. However... I have the feeling that I solved something in the code to complicated. The function is part of an utility class which is used by the company. using third party librarys is not allowed.

Here the corresponding test:

@Test
public void testMaxWithInteger() {
  assertEquals(new Integer(9), NumberUtils.max(4, 2, -4, null, 9, 5));    
}

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
3  
This is not only shorter and clearer, but faster assertEquals(9, NumberUtils.max(4,2,-4,null,9,5)); –  Peter Lawrey Dec 14 '12 at 11:44
    
I seriously can not see why that would be too complicated. You have certain requirements and have to write the code to match it. You don't do anything else so there is no elegance to be gained by removing anything. Sure you can format it in different ways (like removing those silly prefixes from variable names :) ) but those are just personal/organization preferences. –  Torben Dec 14 '12 at 11:52
    
I have removed the "new Integer(...)". That was the result of a mental diarrhea :-) . –  Stefan Beike Dec 14 '12 at 11:55
1  
@Vash: You meant to write Integer.valueOf(int). Parse is not a method in the Integer class. –  Torben Dec 14 '12 at 11:56
    
@Torben Exactly ;-). –  Vash - Damian Leszczyński Dec 14 '12 at 11:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

IMHO I wouldn't use null objects as Integer[] can use 6x as much memory as using int[]

public static Integer max(Integer... ints) {
    long ret = Long.MIN_VALUE;
    for (Integer i: ints) 
      if (null != i && i > ret) 
        ret = i;
    return ret >= Integer.MIN_VALUE? (int) ret : null;
}

Instead of Integer[] I would use int[] and leave 0 or Integer.MIN_VALUE as my "un-initialised" value.

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1  
I love the hungarian notation part ;-) –  assylias Dec 14 '12 at 11:44
1  
@assylias Me too, so much I am removing them ;) –  Peter Lawrey Dec 14 '12 at 11:46
1  
NullPointerException if the first Integer is null in this code. –  Matt Eckert Dec 14 '12 at 11:51
1  
@Torben it works in both cases now. –  Matt Eckert Dec 14 '12 at 11:59
1  
@Torben It won't have Long.MIN_VALUE ;) –  Peter Lawrey Dec 14 '12 at 12:05

I would avoid null check as @Peter suggested or by assigning the value to Integer.MIN_VALUE

public static Integer max(Integer... pNumber) {
    Integer lResult = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
    for (Integer lNumber : pNumber) {
        if (lNumber == null) { //continue if null value encountered. 
            continue;
        }
        if (lNumber > lResult) {
            lResult = lNumber;
        }
    }
    return lResult;
}
share|improve this answer
Collections.max(Arrays.asList(pNumber));
share|improve this answer
    
Does it allow null parameters? –  ignis Dec 14 '12 at 11:39
3  
No it does not allow null values. –  Amit Deshpande Dec 14 '12 at 11:40
    
the test above would fail... so I have to remove the null values? –  Stefan Beike Dec 14 '12 at 11:41
    
That's a bit heavy operation, isn't it. You're basically executing "new Integer[...]; System.arraycopy(...);" only to find the largest integer in an array. –  Torben Dec 14 '12 at 11:43

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