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I wrote a simple TCP Server to serve many clients (it works brilliant with telnet). But, I wanted to write also my own simple TCP client with multiplexing socket and stdin input. Connection with server I wrote as usual, the connection code is ok.

I have a problem with multiplexing socket and stdin input. My code which makes the biggest problem:

    void multiplexClient(FILE *fp, int sockfd, char inbuffer[], char outbuffer[])
    {
        int maxfd;
        fd_set rset;

        FD_ZERO(&rset);
        for(;;)
        {
            FD_SET(fileno(fp), &rset);
            FD_SET(sockfd, &rset);
            maxfd = std::max(fileno(fp), sockfd) + 1;

            int res = select(maxfd, &rset, NULL, NULL, NULL);

            if(res < 0)
            {
                printf("'select error\n");
            }

            if(FD_ISSET(sockfd, &rset))
            {
                if(read(sockfd, inbuffer, sizeof(inbuffer)) == 0)
                   printf("read error\n");
                printf("Received: %s\n", inbuffer);
                fflush(stdout);
                 memset(inbuffer, 0, sizeof(inbuffer));
            }

            else if(FD_ISSET(fileno(fp), &rset))
            {
                fprintf(stdout, "\n> ");
                if(fgets(outbuffer, sizeof(outbuffer), fp) == NULL)
                    return;
                write(sockfd, outbuffer, strlen(outbuffer));
                printf("Send: %s\n", outbuffer);
                fflush(stdout);
                 memset(outbuffer, 0, sizeof(outbuffer));
            }
        }
    }

// int main
// sockfd = socket...
// connect

while(1)
{
 multiplexClient(stdin, socket_fd, inbuffer, outbuffer);
}

// ...
    return 0;
}

My first client:

$ ./client localhost 9034
hello, other client!

> Send: hel
Received: hel
Received: lo! ��~�~���~�
Received: :)

Received: wha

My second client:

$ ./client localhost 9034
hello! :)

> Send: hel
whats is wrong with this chat?!

> Send: lo!

> Send:  :)

> Send: 


> Send: wha

How to fix this?

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your problem lies here (slightly paraphrased):

read(sockfd, inbuffer, sizeof(inbuffer));
printf("Received: %s\n", inbuffer);

The read call returns the number of bytes written (which you ignore) and the buffer is not a C string (ie, it's not null terminated).

What you should have is something along the following lines:

quant = read (sockfd, inbuffer, sizeof(inbuffer));
printf ("Received: %*.*s\n", quant, quant, inbuffer);
share|improve this answer
    
see my edit, that wasnt it :( –  Brian Brown Dec 14 '12 at 13:07
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You're missing a FD_ZERO() before re-adding the file selectors to the set.

Also, this is C++ since it uses std::max().

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added, see my new post - it didnt help too –  Brian Brown Dec 14 '12 at 12:53
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I improved my code as you told me to. But still, problem didnt disappear at all. Thats my improved code:

void multiplexClient(FILE *fp, int sockfd, char inbuffer[], char outbuffer[])
{
    int maxfd;
    fd_set rset;


    for(;;)
    {
        FD_ZERO(&rset);
        FD_SET(fileno(fp), &rset);
        FD_SET(sockfd, &rset);
        maxfd = std::max(fileno(fp), sockfd) + 1;

        int res = select(maxfd, &rset, NULL, NULL, NULL);
        int bytes_read = 0, bytes_written = 0;

        if(res < 0)
        {
            printf("'select error\n");
        }

        if(FD_ISSET(sockfd, &rset))
        {
            bytes_read = read(sockfd, inbuffer, sizeof(inbuffer));
            if(bytes_read <= 0)
            {
                printf("read error\n");
                return;
            }
            inbuffer[bytes_read+1] = '\0';
            printf("Received: %s\n", inbuffer);
            fflush(stdout);
        }

        if(FD_ISSET(fileno(fp), &rset))
        {
            fprintf(fp, "\n> ");
            fflush(fp);
            fgets(outbuffer, sizeof(outbuffer), fp);
            if(bytes_written = write(sockfd, outbuffer, sizeof(outbuffer)) == 0)
            {
                printf("write error\n");
                return;
            }
            outbuffer[bytes_written+1] = '\0';
            printf("Send: %s\n", outbuffer);
            fflush(stdout);
        }
    }
}

First client output:

$ ./client localhost 9034
hello, other client!
Send: h
Received: huh

Second client output:

$ ./client localhost 9034
Received: hel
huh, something is still wrong! :/
Send: h

Its not the servers issue, as I wrote, server works perfect with telnet.

share|improve this answer
    
good .......... –  Grijesh Chauhan Dec 14 '12 at 13:30
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