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I have compiled my kernel(linux-3.6.6) with success in the debian linux version(12.04).(LinuxPraxis ->is the name of my new version) then I made some modification on Read_write.c file ("I mind I write there some printk to get a message when a named pipe is writting and when it is reading").

Now I hear that I need to recompile my new version. please help me to understand it.

Shall I need to recompile my kernel completely or it is another way to recompile a kernel?

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2 Answers 2

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Use "make -j5" to rebuild your kernel image file for host system with 4 cores.

Then run "make install -j5" to install kernel image file.

The "make install" will compress your kernel image file, copy kernel image to /boot and run grub-update to update the grub config file.

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If you have already compiled, the Makefile takes care of only recompiling the parts which depend on the changed file(s). There could still be multiple files which depend on it, but the effort should be significantly smaller than the initial compilation nevertheless. You don't have to do anything differently, the compilation works the same; files which already exist on disk which do not depend on the changed file will simply not be recompiled.

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that means i just need to do make commando? like this /usr/src/linux/ sudo make –  steffleo Dec 14 '12 at 13:09
    
Not familiar with the recent Ubuntu / Debian kernel packaging conventions but yeah, same way you compiled previously. The package scripts will probably actually make some sort of make clean which will require significant recompilation; if so, you don't want to make the package until you at least check that your changes compile correctly. –  tripleee Dec 14 '12 at 13:18
    
ok thx. i will try out and give u a feed back. thank you for your help. –  steffleo Dec 14 '12 at 13:20

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