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I have a fraction and I want to display it neatly and nicely.

For example

4/5

would be

4
-
5

I have looked at this and while this solution is decent the problem lies in having the 4 and the 5 in the same line with a straight line separating them as in traditional fractions.

Any hack or solution would be acceptable. Not necessarily CSS, Javascript or any other language is acceptable

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2  
What would be an "amazing" solution? It looks like you are trying to change the content –  My Head Hurts Dec 14 '12 at 12:35
    
You can not replace a / with a - with just CSS. Your going to use Javascript for this then. –  Ladineko Dec 14 '12 at 12:36
1  
mathjax.org/demos/scaling-math overkill if you just want fractions, also, its javascript –  rob Dec 14 '12 at 12:38
    
Updated the question. Removed the "amazing" part and hopefully clearly put up what I', looking for. And I don't mind a javascript thing –  Carl Saldanha Dec 14 '12 at 12:39
    
Nice @rob though I mentioned fractions above I'll be using this for derivatives and other stuff so your solution is helpful. –  Carl Saldanha Dec 14 '12 at 12:40
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you are happy to use JQuery and want to minimise the mark-up that you need to add then you could use the following:

CSS

.fraction, .top, .bottom {
    padding: 0 5px;    
}

.fraction {
    display: inline-block;
    text-align: center;    
}

.bottom{
    border-top: 1px solid #000;
    display: block;
}

HTML

<span class="fraction">1/2</span>
<span class="fraction">3/4</span>
<span class="fraction">1/32</span>
<span class="fraction">77/102</span>

JQuery

$('.fraction').each(function(key, value) {
    $this = $(this)
    var split = $this.html().split("/")
    if( split.length == 2 ){
        $this.html('
            <span class="top">'+split[0]+'</span>
            <span class="bottom">'+split[1]+'</span>
        ')
    }    
});

Working example: http://jsfiddle.net/xW7d8/

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Use this

<sup>6</sup>/<sub>7</sub>​

DEMO


For straight line

HTML

<div class="top">2</div><div class="bottom">6</div>​

CSS

.top{border-bottom:solid black 1px; display:inline-block; float:left}
.bottom{ display:inline-block; clear:left; float:left}

​DEMO 2

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Nice. But I wanted a straight line –  Carl Saldanha Dec 14 '12 at 12:40
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CSS:

.fraction {
    display: inline-block;
    position: relative;
    vertical-align: middle; 
    letter-spacing: 0.001em;
    text-align: center;
    font-size: 12px;
    }
.fraction > span { 
    display: block; 
    padding: 0.1em; 
    }
.fraction span.fdn {border-top: thin solid black;}
.fraction span.bar {display: none;}

HTML:

Foobar
    <div class="fraction">
        <span class="fup">4</span>
        <span class="bar">/</span>
        <span class="fdn">5</span>
    </div>
Foobar

Change .fraction font-size to get it to a size you want

Example

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You need to use the contextual alternatives available in the font. Support for this isn't great right now, but it will turn up everywhere sooner or later.

If you had the class fractions on the number, you'd use:

.fractions { 
    -moz-font-feature-settings: "frac=1";
    -ms-font-feature-settings: "frac" 1;
}

Annoyingly Gecko uses the raw info that would be passed to the font, but the ms version should become standard.

Here is a demo. http://ie.microsoft.com/testdrive/Graphics/opentype/opentype-fontbureau/index.html#fractions

Right now it's only in Gecko and Trident, but Webkit will surely catch up.

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Chrome supports it since version 16, provided that the -webkit- prefix is used. The main problem is font support: among fonts commonly available on Windows, only the “C fonts” (Cambria, Calibri, etc.) and Palatino Linotype support "frac". Moreover, they rendering has a slanted fraction slash, as opposite to a horizontal line, as the question seems to ask for. Palatino Linotype supports that, too, under the OpenType property name "afrc", but the result is barely legible on normal screen in copy text sizes. –  Jukka K. Korpela Dec 14 '12 at 16:10
2  
Stacked fractions are "afrc". "frac" is for diagonal fractions. –  Tim Jul 8 '13 at 20:51
    
I wasn't aware of that – thanks! –  Rich Bradshaw Jul 8 '13 at 21:20
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You may want to look at something like MathJax which uses Javascript.

If you are only using basic fractions you can use the Unicode characters (or equivalent HTML entities):
¼ ½ ¾ ⅓ ⅔ ⅛ ⅜ ⅝ ⅞

For pure CSS, using the horizontal bar may be "traditional" but most people nowadays use the diagonal slash, even when writing fractions on paper. Here is what I use:

.fraction > sup,
.fraction > sub {
  font-size: .66em;
}
.fraction > sup {
  vertical-align: .4em;
}
.fraction > sub {
  vertical-align: -.2em;
}

With this HTML:

<span class="fraction">
  <sup>1</sup>⁄<sub>8</sub>
</span>
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I find the best combination is using a 0.5em size with the unicode fractional slash (&#x2044; " ⁄ "). The numerator should be vertical-align:super. And if you can affort to drop support for IE7 and below, you can use the :before psuedo-class to make the markup simpler.

.num {
    font-size: 0.5em;
    vertical-align: super;
}
.den {
    font-size: 0.5em;
}
.den:before {
    content: '\2044';
    font-size: 2em;
}

and

<span class="num">19</span><span class="den">45</span>

(Demo)


You can also use the straight unicode approach to render ¹⁹⁄₄₅:

&#x00B9;&#x2079;&#x2044;&#x2084;&#x2085;

(See the wikipedia article.)

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