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I've figured out on how to work around the string but I can't seem to get it to work. Maybe it's because of the scanf that I'm using. Please advise :)

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>

int do_palindrome(char *str, int offset){
int ok = 1;
int length = strlen(str);

if(length/2 > 0)
    ok = (str[0] == str[length - 1 - offset])?
            do_palindrome(++str, ++offset):0;

return ok;
}
int main(){
int i = 0;
int ok = 0;
char* str[1] ;

    scanf("%c", str[1]);
    ok = do_palindrome(str[0], 0);
    printf("%s is palindrome? : %d\n", str[0], ok);


printf("Finished!");
return 0;

}
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scanf("%c", str[1]); ? only one char ? you need to input string to check for palindrome, isnt it? –  Anoop Vaidya Dec 14 '12 at 12:53
    
OT: repeating strlen() at every call isn't elegant at all. How about passing remaining length as recursion parameter, instead of the offset ? –  sylvainulg Dec 14 '12 at 12:55
    
Yes, my bad. The program works if I initialize the code such to : 'char* str[] = {"sasaki", "SOS", "12344321", "1234322", "555", "0", "ikki"};' I suppose I should scanf %s to str[0] but that still won't work. –  Amin Husni Dec 14 '12 at 13:00
2  
Nobody will frown if you use indention and code formatting, quite the opposite actually. –  Lundin Dec 14 '12 at 13:06
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted
char* str[1] ;

declares an array of one char pointer

scanf("%c", str[1]);

reads a single char but tries to place it beyond the end of your array (C arrays are zero-based).

I think you want to read a string (char array). You can do this using

char str[20]; /* change the array size as required */
scanf("%19s", str); /* read one fewer chars than your array size */
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I thought the char *str[1] is supposed to hold a single string? The program still won't work even if I change it to 20 :( The code only works if I initialize the string but won't work if I scan for a string. –  Amin Husni Dec 14 '12 at 12:55
    
You need to allocate memory to hold a string. You can do this either on the stack - char str[20], or the heap - char* str = malloc(20) –  simonc Dec 14 '12 at 12:59
    
The program works if I initialize the code such to : 'char* str[] = {"sasaki", "SOS", "12344321", "1234322", "555", "0", "ikki"};' I suppose I should scanf %s to str[0] but that still won't work The working original code is here: pastebin.com/Xuyrh9QH –  Amin Husni Dec 14 '12 at 13:03
    
@AminHusni Do you want to handle a single string or an array of strings? Your most recent comment and code like char* str[] give arrays of strings but your program looks like it only needs a single string. –  simonc Dec 14 '12 at 13:08
    
I actually wanted to handle a single string. According to the original 7 string program. I can't seem to grasp the idea of processing a single string instead of 7. I really appreciate your help. –  Amin Husni Dec 14 '12 at 13:10
show 3 more comments

What you're thinking about is the struct hack:

typedef struct {
    char s[1];
} String;

int main()
{
    /* allocate 15 extra bytes for the string */
    String *s = malloc(sizeof *s + 15);

This allows you to declare an array of size 1 and then use it as a variable length, but you still have to give it some memory (via malloc) to use it. Then you can access it via s.

If you want a variable length string, you should malloc the amount of data you need. If you want to do it a little hacky (and if you're going to compile with Gcc) you can do this:

char * str;
scanf("%ms", str);
ok = do_palindrome(str, 0);
printf("%s is palindrome? : %d\n", str, ok);
free(str);
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char* str[10] ;
scanf("%s", str);
ok = do_palindrome(str, 0);
printf("%s is palindrome? : %d\n", str, ok);

You are trying to read a string to char type which is wrong and should be of type string. Also the subroutine call to do_palindrome should contain base address of str than just first character of the string.

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if(length/2 > 0)
    ok = (str[0] == str[length - 1 - offset]) ?
            do_palindrome(++str, ++offset):0;

This statement will run (length - 1) times. When we check for palindrome, we only need to do (length / 2) comparisons. So I suggest to change code to the following:

if (length >= 2 && (length / 2) >= offset) {
    ok = (str[0] == str[length - 1 - offset]) ?
            isPalindrome(++str, ++offset) : 0;
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