Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have simulation data for the velocity of water molecules. The format of the data is as below. I would like to describe the format of the data for clarity purposes, and it easily would lead to what I want to calculate.

A water molecule is made of three atoms: Oxygen(O) and two Hydrogen (H). Here I would name them O, H1, and H2.

The data below starts with line title 0 and the number 4335, saying it contains 4335 atoms (4335/3 = 1445 water molecules).

The first three numbers starting from the third row ( 0.0923365 0.0341984 -0.1248516 ) representing velocity for oxygen (O) atom at three Cartesian directions Ox, Oy, Oz. The next three numbers, in the same row representing velocities for hydrogen (H1) ==> H1x, H1y, H1z. And finally the first three numbers in fourth row representing velocities for hydrogen (H2) ==> H2x,H2y,H2z. finally, the following three numbers in the same fourth row representing velocities for oxygen atom.

These sequence is goes on for all 4335 atoms in 2170 lines including the top two lines in the data file and it repeats for the following section starting from title 1.

title 0
4335  2.0001000e+04
 0.0923365   0.0341984  -0.1248516  -0.8946258   1.6688854   0.8259304
 0.2890579   0.8051153  -1.5612963   0.0625492  -0.1361579   0.2869132
 0.2343408  -0.0665305   1.0745378  -0.8375892   0.6953992   0.5149021
-0.1628550   0.0131844   0.0688080   0.2429340   0.2168210  -0.0289806
-0.3677613   0.2054004  -0.1511643  -0.3487551  -0.1454157   0.0801884
-0.9039297  -0.0682939  -0.2337404  -0.5605327  -0.0369157   0.2243892
-0.3100274  -0.2673132  -0.2093299   0.1975043  -0.4572202  -0.8410826
-0.6995287  -0.4123909   0.0649209  -0.1910519   0.2289656   0.2443295
-0.0279093   0.5790939  -0.0104249  -1.1961776  -0.5387340   0.1445187
-0.3188485   0.3789352  -0.0112114   0.7831523   0.6043882  -0.7131590
-0.7214440  -0.5358508  -0.3035673  -0.1549275  -0.1402387  -0.0101964
-0.2027608   1.5107149   0.2963312  -1.5104872  -0.1554981  -1.3323215
 0.1097982  -0.1553742   0.3803437   0.0816858   0.0265007   0.4215823
 0.1157368   0.2100116   0.4712551   0.1799426  -0.1260255  -0.2131755
 0.1811777  -0.9442581  -0.6036636   0.9681703  -0.1523646  -0.3502441
 0.0976771   0.0019619  -0.1832204  -0.0055989   0.2701100  -0.4416720
 0.8496723   0.4070951  -0.0819204   0.1156806  -0.1619873  -0.0016126
-0.4051959   0.4263505  -0.9460036   0.4412067   0.1002270   0.5864405
-0.3831136   0.3240860  -0.0005143  -0.5667163   0.2618876   0.0103317
-0.6442209   0.3965833  -0.0778050  -0.2404238  -0.1339887  -0.1662417
 0.3421198   0.7480828  -1.8316993  -0.4454920  -0.0499657  -0.1951254
-0.2895359  -0.1934811  -0.2674928   0.1255802   1.3522828  -0.2829485
-0.4129106  -0.6842645  -1.0147657  -0.1278501  -0.0597648  -0.1478294
-0.2519974   0.0665314  -0.0690079  -0.0480210  -0.1179547  -0.2091919
-0.1942484   0.2583650  -0.0734658  -0.1216313   0.5158040  -0.0676843
-0.3063602   0.8148463  -0.1959571  -0.1009838  -0.3394633  -0.0866587
 .
 .     (goes on until line 2170)
 .
 0.1028815  -0.0844088  -0.2156557  -0.1698745  -0.2018967  -0.3863209
 0.1793070  -0.1005802   0.1800752  -0.1404713   0.2216020   0.2236271
 0.5192825  -0.7398186   0.0418758   0.0347715  -0.3457840  -0.1300237
-0.3089482   1.1125441  -0.4020403   0.2739744  -0.9062766   0.0012294
 0.1498538   0.0883857  -0.0094638   0.0963565  -1.1027019   0.0115313
-0.0432824   0.3330713   0.0304943
title 1
4335  2.0002000e+04
-0.2082078   0.1774843  -0.1023302  -0.1100437   0.5973607   1.0627041
-0.2216015   0.0448885  -0.8415924   0.1691296   0.6008261  -0.0373434
 0.9387534  -0.3642305   0.6756270  -0.6000357   0.6632088   1.0567899
-0.3234407  -0.1781680  -0.1936070  -0.4799916  -0.1522612  -0.2347461
 0.1045985   0.1999704  -0.1482928  -0.0439331   0.0413923   0.1605458
 0.3403952  -0.2012104   0.4851457  -0.9665228   0.2202362   0.0046218
 .
 .   (goes on until line 2170)
 .   

What I want to calculate is the resultant velocity for each molecule and I would like to do this using Perl. The algorithm goes in this way.

First store the velocities for oxygen (O) and hydrogens (H1 & H2) in Ox,Oy,Oz, H1x,H1y,H1z and H2x,H2y,H2z respectively.

Next we define:

    velocity_x = Ox + Hx + Hx
    velocity_y = Oy + Hy + Hy
    velocity_z = Oz + Hz + Hz

Finally calculate

  resultant_velocity = sqrt(velocity_x**2 + velocity_y**2  + velocity_z**2)

and store the "resultant_velocity" into new file (the file should be title_0.dat). And the program shall calculate the velocities starting from title 1 until title 200 in the file.

I am a newbie at Perl, but I would like to do this operation in Perl since I find that it is very interesting. I can write simple "read and write" operations in Perl but found no idea how to split and assign the values to the variables and carryout the calculation though the calculation is high school standard.

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

$data_file="malto.dat";
open(DAT, $data_file) || die("Could not open file!");
@raw_data=<DAT>;
close(DAT);

while(<@raw_data>){
@columns=split /\s+/,$_; 
if($columns[0]=~ m/ATOM/){ 
print "$columns[5], $columns[6], $columns[7]\n";
    }
}

I would like to get some guidance from experts so that I can enhance my understanding of Perl while working on the code.

Appreciate any help. Regards

share|improve this question
1  
I don't understand the format completely: Why are there in the fourth row another three columns for the oxygen atom when the third row contains this data in the first three columns? –  mpe Dec 14 '12 at 14:13
3  
You're attempting to match ATOM in your data, but that word's not shown in your data sample. Is there more to this data? On a separate note, you have a very low acceptance rate which may significantly impact the number of responses you receive. –  Kenosis Dec 14 '12 at 14:34
1  
To add to what others have said: you seem to know enough Perl to go through the file and perform basic operations. And the algorithm is simple. Why not try actually writing the code for the algorithm yourself? Your pseudo-code like resultant_velocity = sqrt(velocity_x**2 + velocity_y**2 + velocity_z**2) is already almost Perl code. Literally the only change it needs is to use Perl variables. –  dan1111 Dec 14 '12 at 14:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Perhaps the following will assist you:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Math::Complex;

my $dataFile = 'malto.dat';

{
    local $/ = 'title ';
    open my $fh, '<', $dataFile or die $!;

    while (<$fh>) {
        chomp;

        my @data = split or next;

        my $titleNum     = 'Title ' . shift @data;
        my $atom         = shift(@data) . ' ' . shift @data;
        my $resultantVel = calcResultantVel( \@data );

        print $titleNum, "\n";
        print $atom,     "\n";
        print 'ResultantVel: ' . $resultantVel, "\n\n";
    }

    close $fh;
}

sub calcResultantVel {
    my ($dataRef) = @_;

    my ($velocity_x, $velocity_y, $velocity_z);

    while ( my @nums = splice( @$dataRef, 0, 9 ) ) {
        $velocity_x += $nums[0] + $nums[3] + $nums[6];
        $velocity_y += $nums[1] + $nums[4] + $nums[7];
        $velocity_z += $nums[2] + $nums[5] + $nums[8];
    }

    return sqrt( $velocity_x**2 + $velocity_y**2 + $velocity_z**2 );
}

The word and space title is used as the record separator, so each read takes in a chunk of data that's delimited by title. The chomp removes the record separator, and then the record is split on whitespace.

The zeroth element is the title number, and that's shifted off @data. The first and second elements of @data are the atom count, and they're shifted off, too. The remaining array elements are the Cartesian directions, and a reference to that array is send to the subroutine calcResultantVel.

The subroutine takes a chunk of nine elements at a time: three for O atom, three for the first H atom, and three for the second H atom, and a running sum is kept based upon the definition you've provided. Finally, the resultant velocity is returned.

Here's some sample output:

Title 0
4335 2.0001000e+04
ResultantVel: 13.2945751170603

Title 1
4335 2.0001000e+04
ResultantVel: 12.7696611061461

You can visually verify that it's working correctly. Since you "...can write simple 'read and write' operations in Perl...," the next step is to have it write the desired results to a file.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your kind reply. By the way could you kindly explain the meaning of (local $/ = 'title ';) a nd (my $titleNum = 'Title ' . shift @data;) ? I know @ stand for an array. But why you use "local" and " .shift @data)? I am trying to use this code for running the calculation. Thank you. –  Vijay Dec 16 '12 at 8:51
    
@Vijay - $/ is Perl's input record separator. It's default value is "\n", but it can be set to anything--or nothing at all (paragraph mode). Using a local version within a code block will no disturb its global value. You'll notice that the record is split on whitespace, and the results are placed into an array. The zeroth element $data[0] contains the title number, since title was removed using chomp. shift takes $data[0] off of the array and into a variable, so $titleNum = 'Title ' . shift @data;' concatenates 'Title '` with the element in $data[0], and removes it. –  Kenosis Dec 16 '12 at 17:09

Here's my advice: break the job down into small components, and write a method for each meaningful part of the work. To wit:

use strict;
use warnings;

main(@ARGV); # Pass data file name on command line. Don't hard-code it.

sub main {
    my $data_f = shift;
    open(my $data_h, '<', $data_f) or die "$!: $data_f";
    while (my $section = get_section($data_h)){
        # Also write methods that can be called here to make 
        # desired computations, print output, etc.
    }
}

sub get_section {
    # Takes a file handle.
    # Returns a hash reference containing all of the data
    # for an entire section of the file.
    my $h = shift;
    return if eof($h);
    chomp (my $title = <$h>);
    my ($n_atoms) = <$h> =~ /^(\d+)/;
    return {
        'title'     => $title,
        'n_atoms'   => $n_atoms,
        'molecules' => get_molecules($h, $n_atoms / 3),
    };
}

sub get_molecules {
    my @molecules;
    return \@molecules;
}

I have not written the get_molecules() method. It takes a file handle and an integer (N of molecules). It could return a reference to an array-of-arrays or maybe an array-of-hashes, with each inner array/hash holding the info for a single molecule.

share|improve this answer

Thanks for your help and guide. I have tried to modify your code as below. It works at least for my need.

#!/usr/bin/perl
###############

#use strict;
#use warnings;
use Math::Complex;

open    OUTPUT, '>', "velocityOnly.dat" or die "Can't create filehandle: $!";

my $dataFile = 'velF1F2.vel';

{
local $/ = 'title ';
open my $FH, '<', $dataFile or die $!;

while (<$FH>) {
    chomp;

    my @data = split or next;

    my $titleNum     = 'Title ' . shift(@data);
    my $atom         = shift(@data) . ' ' . shift(@data);
    #my $resultantVel = calcResultantVel( \@data );

    #print OUTPUT "$titleNum", "\n";
print "$titleNum", "\n";

for my $i (1..1445)
{
    $j=(9*($i-1));  

   $velocity_x = $data[($j+0)] + $data[($j+3)] + $data[($j+6)];
   $velocity_y = $data[($j+1)] + $data[($j+4)] + $data[($j+7)];
   $velocity_z = $data[($j+2)] + $data[($j+5)] + $data[($j+8)];

   $velo = sprintf '%.3f',sqrt( $velocity_x**2 + $velocity_y**2 + $velocity_z**2 );
        chomp $velo;
        print   "$velo","\n";
        print   OUTPUT  "$velo\n";

    }

    #print 'ResultantVel: ' . $resultantVel, "\n\n";
    }

   close $FH;
   }

But I would like to extend further by adding some other functionality for doing some complex calculations. The code

Before that, I need some guide on making the below code into subroutine. I am bit lost here. Your CODE actually add all the X, Y and Z and finally find the velocity. But what I want is not that. Each 9 values subsequently represent coordinate for a water molecule which contain three atoms.

(The number 1445 is number of molecules. Each molecule contain three atoms and each atom has three coordinates.So for a water molecule has 9 Cartesian coordinates.)

the i here represent number of water molecule

for my $i (1..1445)
{
    $j=(9*($i-1));  

   $velocity_x = $data[($j+0)] + $data[($j+3)] + $data[($j+6)];
   $velocity_y = $data[($j+1)] + $data[($j+4)] + $data[($j+7)];
   $velocity_z = $data[($j+2)] + $data[($j+5)] + $data[($j+8)];

   $velo = sprintf '%.3f',sqrt( $velocity_x**2 + $velocity_y**2 + $velocity_z**2 );
        chomp $velo;
        print   "$velo","\n";
        print   OUTPUT  "$velo\n";

    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.