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I've been working on refactoring an application to make it more manageable with dependency injection and all that good stuff. When doing this I have encountered cyclic dependencies more than once.

So here is a typical example of cyclic dpendency:

interface IA
{
    int Data { get; }
}
interface IBefore
{
    void DoStuffBefore();
}
class A: IA
{
    public int Data { get; private set; }
    IBefore before;
    public A(IBefore before)
    {
        this.before = before;
    }
    public void Increment()
    {
        before.DoStuffBefore();
        Data++;
    }
}
class B: IBefore
{
    IA a;
    public B(IA a)
    {
        this.a = a;
    }
    public void WriteADataToConsole()
    {
        Console.Write(a.Data);
    }
    public void DoStuffBefore() //From IBefore
    {
        WriteADataToConsole();
    }
}

I cannot create neither of the classes since they require eachother. Now the standard(?) thing to do in this case would be to separate A's data from A:

public interface IA
{
    int Data { get; set; }
}
public interface IBefore
{
    void DoStuffBefore();
}
class AData : IA
{
    public int Data { get; set; }
}
class A
{
    public IA Data { get; private set; }
    IBefore before;
    public A(IA data, IBefore before)
    {
        this.Data = data;
        this.before = before;
    }
    public void Increment()
    {
        before.DoStuffBefore();
        Data.Data++;
    }
}
class B : IBefore
{
    IA a;
    public B(IA a)
    {
        this.a = a;
    }
    public void WriteADataToConsole()
    {
        Console.Write(a.Data);
    }
    public void DoStuffBefore() //From IBefore
    {
        WriteADataToConsole();
    }
}

The above solves the circular dpendency because I can now create AData first and then inject it into B and inject B into A. But I could also put an event i IA that B can listen to:

public interface IA
{
    int Data { get; }
    event Action BeforeEvent;
}

class A: IA
{
    public int Data { get; private set; }
    public event Action BeforeEvent;
    public void Increment()
    {
        BeforeEvent();
        Data++;
    }
}

class B
{
    IA a;
    public B(IA a)
    {
        this.a = a;
        a.BeforeEvent += new Action(WriteADataToConsole);
    }
    void WriteADataToConsole() //Event listener
    {
        Console.Write(a.Data);
    }
}

This is sonething I stumbled upon because I was trying to convert the event approach to dependency injection and realised that by doing so I had gotten myself a circular dependency.

Some of the questions that's been troubleing my brain are:

  • Both solutions solve the circular dependency(right?) and as far as I can see they open up for extension of A to an equal degree, but which would be considered the best design?
  • What would be some guidelines for when to use events and when to use DI to solve circular dependencies and in general?
  • Obviously events are not good if A would need a return value from B. Does that mean that events are always preferrable when void is returned?
  • What are the pros and cons of each solution?
share|improve this question
    
I have put all of your classes declaration one by one [1st, second and last] Every one compiled –  Kamran Shahid Dec 14 '12 at 14:14
    
@Kamran Yes they do indeed compile. The problem with the first one is that you can't wire them together. IA a = new A(here you need to inject B) but you can't because to create B you need to create A first. Also I don't know what happened to the code blocks. Indentation looked alright in the preview. –  Rickard Dec 14 '12 at 14:39
    
If I run into cyclic dependencies I take this as a hint that I should use another approach. Maybe a pipeline of some sort that works on the data only is a solution? –  Sebastian Weber Dec 14 '12 at 14:55
1  
Anything that helps you design and implement cycles is just hiding the fact that you have a very, very poor design. If two things depend on each other, you don't have two things, you have one thing. –  Peter Ritchie Dec 14 '12 at 17:24
    
@PeterRitchie Isn't that over simplistic though? You are probably right on the poor design, but you haven't convinced me on the solution. The common answer I find for solving circular dependencies is: If two things depend on each other, you don't have two things, you have three things. I have never seen merging proposed as an answer to that before. Also, are you saying that if I have a class with e.g. a DataGridView, then that class cannot listen to any of the DataGridView's events because then I have designed and implemented a cycle? –  Rickard Dec 17 '12 at 6:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Good question! In 95% cases you have to either merge this two entities together or break dependency some other way, but… What if you can't for one reason or another merge'em into one entity (working with UI sometimes could be such tricky)? There is a book about "Dependency Injection in .NET" by Mark Seemann where described two approaches to break cyclic dependencies:

  • Events — preferable way according to DI book and you already did this. It's looks fine for me
  • Property Injection — in contrast to Constructor Injection, Property Injection means that injected resourse is optional.

In your 2nd implementation with properties there is a constructor: public A(IA data, IBefore before) . Both IA data and IBefore before are required in terms of dependency injection — here is a best point to breack cicle! Here is an implemnetation with optional IBefore:

class A
{
    public IA Data { get; private set; }
    public IBefore Before { get; set; }

    public A(IA data)
    {
        this.Data = data;
    }
    public void Increment()
    {
        // here should be design decision: if Before is optional…
        if(Before == null)
        {
            Before.DoStuffBefore();
        }    

        // …or required
        if(Before == null)
        {
            throw new Exception("'Before' is required");
        }

        Data.Data++;
    }
}

It up to you, either to skip Before.DoStuffBefore() call if Before is optional, or raise an exception if it's required

According to your questions:

  • Which would be considered the best design? What would be some guidelines? Pros and cons — imho both are ok. Event is more general. Properties is more easy to implement and to handle
  • Events are always preferrable when void is returned? — Yes for me
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer! Nice with litterature reference and discussion. I never really thought about the optional aspect. –  Rickard Dec 18 '12 at 7:08

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