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I'm trying to insert into a map, where the key is a class. I've overloaded the operator< function in my class as below:

struct MyType
{
    int a, b, c;
    bool operator<(const MyType& Rhs) const
    {
       return (a<Rhs.a) || (b<Rhs.b) || (c<Rhs.c);
    }
}

But for certain (unique) keys, values are being overwritten in the map.

What is the preferred operator< method for a multi value key?

I've seen Defining operator< for a struct which uses a tuple, but I'd rather write it long hand if I can.

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2  
Your order is not a strict weak order. You must not use this class as a key for a std::map as it is written. –  Kerrek SB Dec 14 '12 at 14:16
    
@KerrekSB What is a strict weak order? –  Neil Dec 14 '12 at 14:18
    
Something you can discover on the internet :-) Or search this website for hundreds of duplicates. –  Kerrek SB Dec 14 '12 at 14:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This expression

(a<Rhs.a) || (b<Rhs.b) || (c<Rhs.c)

does not create a strict weak ordering: suppose a > Rhs.a, but b < Rhs.b. Your expression returns true, yet it should be false: b should be used to resolve ties only when as are the same, and then cs should be used only when as and bs are the same.

This leads to the following "staircase" expression:

(a<Rhs.a) ||
(a==Rhs.a && b<Rhs.b) ||
(a==Rhs.a && b==Rhs.b && c<Rhs.c)

This is the long way of writing the expression suggested in Kerrek SB's answer, which I recommend you to use for its far superior readability.

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It seems the version of boost I have to use (1.33.1) doesn't support this, so I'll have to implement it long hand. Thanks –  Neil Dec 14 '12 at 15:00

Do this instead:

return std::tie(a, b, c) < std::tie(Rhs.a, Rhs.b, Rhs.c);

You need to #include <tuple>.

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I'd rather not use a tuple. –  Neil Dec 14 '12 at 14:18
1  
@Kerrek: Please explain that a bit so the OP can understand why it would work. –  Nawaz Dec 14 '12 at 14:18
1  
+1 I assume that you'd explain the "strict weak order" thing from your comment, too. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 14 '12 at 14:19
    
@dasblinkenlight: There are too many duplicates of this topic on SO already. The OP is invited to search the site for a deeper explanation made by better people. –  Kerrek SB Dec 14 '12 at 14:21
    
@Neil: Do it anyway. The code uses references only, so there's basically no cost. Unless you fancy news headlines like "Child reinvents wheel. Scientists baffled." –  Kerrek SB Dec 14 '12 at 14:22

The problem is that if you instance two MyType like say for example M1 = {1, 1, 2} and M2 = {1, 2, 1} you have the unfortunate situation that M1 < M2 and M2 < M1!

In order to fix this you need to assign a b and c some significance/order:

struct MyType
{
    int a, b, c;
    bool operator<(const MyType& Rhs) const
    {
       if (a < Rhs.a) return true;
       if (a > Rhs.a) return false;
       if (b < Rhs.b) return true;
       if (b > Rhs.b) return false;
       return c < Rhs.c;
    }
}

(This is a less optimal way to write the expression in dasblinkenlight's answer but maybe easier to understand).

But once you've understood why this is needed you should switch to a tuple, this really is boilerplate code.

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If you need map with key of that type and do not need comparator, you might want to use boost::unordered_map and define hasher for your type using boost::hash_combine

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