Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

http://jsfiddle.net/CbL7W/ example of scroll event behavior.

I have this script that is working correctly in both Chrome and Firefox.

var stickyNavigationOffsetTop = $('.top-nav').offset().top;
var stickyNavigation = function () {
    var scrollTop = $(window).scrollTop();
    if (scrollTop > stickyNavigationOffsetTop) {
        $('.top-nav').css({ 'position': 'fixed', 'top': 0, 'left': 0, 'opacity': .8 });
    } else {
        $('.top-nav').css({ 'position': 'relative', 'opacity': 1 });
    }
};
stickyNavigation();
$(window).scroll(function () {
    stickyNavigation();
});

But there is a little problem with Internet Explorer: On the same page I have that script I have a link with a script that hides a div, when this happens sometimes the page completely scrolls back to the top of the page, but IE is not firing $(window).scroll when that happens.

Screenshot of the issue when page goes back to top.

Chrome (OK): http://i.stack.imgur.com/6WJx7.jpg

IE (Wrong): http://i.stack.imgur.com/CXbKk.jpg

share|improve this question
    
I don't think any scrolling should occur when the page gets shorter. You could try changing scrolltop before you remove the div. –  Asad Dec 14 '12 at 14:56
    
But why are Chrome and Firefox firing the scroll event? The thing with that div is that is a collapsable section, whe are not actually removing but hiding it. –  Tebo Dec 14 '12 at 15:42
    
In my case (OP's could be different) Chrome and Firefox fire the scroll event because hiding the div causes the scroll bar to be removed from the window. This means that the scroll position has changed back to 0 by default, which I'd say constitutes a scroll event. –  Walter Stabosz Jan 21 '13 at 16:33
    
Exactly! but IE guys just need to be different :P –  Tebo Jan 25 '13 at 19:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have the same issue, and as much as I dislike it, my work-around is to trigger the window.scroll event when I show/hide the div. $(window).trigger('scroll');

share|improve this answer
    
It kinda work hehe... mixed with jquery delay as seen on blog.project-sierra.de/archives/1559 it's a good workaround. IE is still a little buggy with this solution so our final call was to remove this sticky navigation feature. Thanks anyway for the solution! –  Tebo Jan 28 '13 at 20:13
    
This solution worked perfectly for my issue with IE not firing the scrolling event when a href would pop the page to the top, even though it works fine in modern browsers. –  tokyovariable Dec 25 '13 at 2:21

See this answer on this article

I think changing

$(window).scrollTop() to 
$(document).scrollTop() 

may resolve the IE issue.

share|improve this answer
    
Nope... not working :( –  Tebo Dec 14 '12 at 18:04
    
Well sorry about that, do you have a dev page where this can be accessed? –  marty Dec 20 '12 at 20:51
    
I created a jsFiddle to illustrate the problem. jsfiddle.net/CbL7W –  Walter Stabosz Jan 21 '13 at 16:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.