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We do use util functions and some functionalities like Logger,EventWriter,Some Common DB calls,etc often in our code. I prefer these functions to be static, because instantiating the functions from these classes in every one of my code would be a serious performance hit(would it be ?!!!? , i've read in stackoverflow that too much of class instantiantions would be a performance hit, I'm working on a Project with big Customer Database and high access log in the server). And i have came across static import in java which looks cool and i want to know is there any Serious Considerations there before using it ..?

Things i've gathered already from StackOverFlow :

--> Using static import could make the Code Non-Readable, like judging the function definition.

Other than that , any Pretty issues which i have to worry about ..?

Old Code :

class myservlet extends httpServlet
{
    pubilc doPost()
    {
        Utils utils = new Utils();
        DBFuncs dbFuncs = new dbFuncs();
        Logger logger = new Logger();
        EventWrtr eventWrtr = new EventWriter();

        utils.GetEscapedName(name);
        logger.Log("error");
        eventWrtr.WriteEvent("something happened");
        // Getting new Objects for every servlet calls

    }
}

My Current Code : ( Hope this will avoid unnecessary Instantiations, the code was like above, i'm changing it now like this)

/* Declaring all the methods in the below classes as static methods */  
import com.mycom.Utils;
import com.mycom.DBFuncs;
import com.mycom.Logger;
import com.mycom.EventWrtr;
class myservlet extends httpServlet
{
    public doPost()
    {
        Utils.GetEscapedName(name);
        Logger.Log("error");
        EventWrtr.WriteEvent("something happened");         
    }
}

I Kinda like this and i want to know any Serious Issues especially performance related in using the below approach

/* Declaring all the methods in the below classes as static methods */  
import static com.mycom.Utils;
import static com.mycom.DBFuncs;
import static com.mycom.Logger;
import static com.mycom.EventWrtr;
class myservlet extends httpServlet
{
    public doPost()
    {
        GetEscapedName(name);
        Log("error");
        WriteEvent("something happened");           
    }
}
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1  
You either read wrong or those were bad answers. Your app might not perform well, but it won't be because of static imports. You sound like you're confusing import with class loading. And class loading is done once when a class is first required by the JVM. –  duffymo Dec 14 '12 at 15:11
1  
By pretty issue I assume you mean petty, which the whole thing is. Use static imports if you want. –  Perception Dec 14 '12 at 15:12
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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The static import feature is a syntactic sugar kind of feature, so it cannot have performance implications. It does have negative consequences to readability and testability, though:

  • You dump the content of a potentially large class into your current namespace, making your code harder to read; modern IDEs mitigate this by letting you navigate to the definition of the object by clicking its name in a program.
  • Your code relies upon static objects, making it extremely hard to test. For example, you cannot easily drop a mock logger, and expect your code start using it. This is a general limitation of using static objects, though - you get it when you use static objects, with or without the static import.
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no it will not make any performance issue. but its better to use normal import Please don’t use this feature, because over a period you may not understand which static method or static attribute belongs to which class inside the java program. The program may become unreadable.

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The answer to your question is:

No.

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