Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Is there anyway I can clean up

if($class == 2 AND $posts >=1){$showpost ="1";} else {$showpost ="$posts";
if($class == 3 AND $posts >=2){$showpost ="2";} else {$showpost ="$posts";
if($class == 4 AND $posts >=3){$showpost ="3";} else {$showpost ="$posts";
if($class == 5 AND $posts >=4){$showpost ="4";} else {$showpost ="$posts";
if($class == 6 AND $posts >=5){$showpost ="5";} else {$showpost ="$posts";
if($class == 7 AND $posts >=6){$showpost ="6";} else {$showpost ="$posts";
}}}}}}

As I don't want }}}}}} at the end.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
if (($class >= 2) && ($class <= 7) && ($posts >= $class - 1))
    $showpost = $class - 1;
else
    $showpost = $posts;

The if is split into two sections:

 if (
     ($class >= 2) && ($class <= 7) // Check $class is between 2 and 7 inclusive

     && ($posts >= $class - 1)) // Check $posts >= $class -1
                                // so if $class is 4 this checks if $posts >= 3

This matches the logic in your original code - it's just a matter of seeing the pattern.

If you need $showpost to be a string (chances are you don't), you can cast to string like this:

$showpost = (string)$showpost;
share|improve this answer
1  
This solution worked, but could you explain this, as it makes no sense to me. –  Homework Sep 7 '09 at 8:22
1  
($class >= 2) && ($class <= 7) - checks to make sure at least one of the if statements would have had its first part true. ($posts >= $class - 1) - checks to make sure that if statement would also have its second part true. $showpost = $class - 1; - does that the applicable if-statement body would have done. $showpost = $posts; - does what would have happened if none of the if statements were true. –  Amber Sep 7 '09 at 8:29
    
Thanks indeed. That helps out a lot. –  Homework Sep 7 '09 at 8:30

You can strip all $showpost ="$posts"; statements except for the last:

if ($class == 2 AND $posts >=1) {
    $showpost = "1";
} else if ($class == 3 AND $posts >=2) {
    $showpost = "2";
} else if ($class == 4 AND $posts >=3) {
    $showpost = "3";
} else if ($class == 5 AND $posts >=4) {
    $showpost = "4";
} else if ($class == 6 AND $posts >=5) {
    $showpost = "5";
} else if ($class == 7 AND $posts >=6) {
    $showpost = "6";
} else {
    $showpost ="$posts";
}

Or even summarize it to this:

if ($class >= 2 && $class <= 7 && $posts >= ($class - 1)) {
    $showposts = $class - 1;
} else {
    $showposts = $posts;
}
share|improve this answer
    
you can also remove unnecessary quotes as in $showpost = "$posts"; and $showpost = "1"; –  Salman A Sep 7 '09 at 8:23
    
Thanks for the summarized version. –  Homework Sep 7 '09 at 8:31

You can use this, not nice but will work.

if($posts >= ($class - 1) AND $class >= 2 AND $class < 8) { $showpost = $class - 1; }
else { $showpost = $posts; }
share|improve this answer
    
The variables end up as strings in the example code, so you need strval to make it similar. –  OIS Sep 7 '09 at 8:22
    
@joey: $post have to be equal or larger then ($class - 1) in every if sentence in example. $class have to be larger then 1 and less then 8. Just put those 3 requirements together and you got the code by martin. –  OIS Sep 7 '09 at 8:26
    
Thanks, it's not a nice looking, but it works! –  Homework Sep 7 '09 at 8:30

Make a Karnaugh map. Don't avoid "switch" when it actually makes sense.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.