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I was wondering what would be the best way to handle complex structures with relationships?

I am implementing a galaxy generation algorithm for my project, basically i have simple enums of

GalaxySize { Small, Medium, Large };
GalaxyAge { Young, Mature, Ancient}; 
StarTypes { Black = 1, White = 3, Yellow = 1, Red = 3 };

I am generating stars limited by the value of GalaxySize so far so good. Then i get randomly a type from StarTypes and create a star from this type. What i want to do is have a relationship between the StarTypes and the GalaxyAge.

Meaning that in a young galaxy (for example) there will be a higher chance for Yellow and White stars, and in a ancient galaxy there will be a higher chance for black and red stars.

What i am thinking of is having a base chance for a StarType to get "rolled" and then add the modifier depending on the GalaxyAge, which will result in more of the more common stars in the specific galaxy age.

Example: weight (chance) of a white star in young galaxy is 3 base + 3 
from the "young" galaxy age modifier 
against the weight of a red star which has 3 base + 1 from the "young" modifier.


Resulting in:
White star type weight = (3 + 3 ) * rand.nextDouble() 
Red star type weight = (3 + 1) * rand.nextDouble()

Any suggestions on how to realize/represent this functionality since obviously enums alone will not be enough? :)

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1  
Looks like a funny project :) –  Paolo Tedesco Dec 14 '12 at 16:02
1  
Why is White == Red ? Why is Black == Yellow? –  Jan Van Herck Dec 14 '12 at 16:10
    
This represents their "base" chance of occurring, i do think that different enum keys can have same value, correct me if im wrong? –  Hammer Dec 16 '12 at 7:05
    
@Hammer - You're correct in that you can assign the same value to multiple keys. However, it means you can never use that enum in any variable or logic flow. Because as soon as you do var starType = StarTypes.Black, you now can't tell whether the starType is Black or Yellow. Both starType == Black and starType == Yellow will return true. –  Bobson Dec 17 '12 at 14:48
    
@Hammer - The "correct" way to do it is to have a non-duplicative enum, with a Dictionary<StarType, int> which relates each type to it's appropriate chance. –  Bobson Dec 17 '12 at 14:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I didn't really understand the algorithm but you can start from this:

sealed class Age
{
    public static readonly Young = new Size(3.0);
    public static readonly Mature = new Size(2.0);
    public static readonly Ancient = new Size(1.0);

    public double Weight
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }

    private Age(float weight)
    {
        Weight = weight;
    }
}

sealed class Size
{
    public static readonly Small = new Size(3.0);
    public static readonly Medium = new Size(2.0);
    public static readonly Large = new Size(1.0);

    public double Weight
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }

    private Size(float weight)
    {
        Weight = weight;
    }
}

Now let's define a class for Galaxy:

sealed class Galaxy
{
    public Age Age
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public Size Size
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

Now you have to define a class to define the star:

abstract class Star
{
    protected Star(string color, Galaxy galaxy)
    {
        Color = color;
        Galaxy = galaxy;
    }

    public string Color
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }

    public Galaxy Galaxy
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }

    public abstract float Chances(Random rnd);
}

Now let's define a new class for each star (don't forget to change algorithm, formula and weights according to what it is in reality for each type):

sealed class WhiteStar : Star
{
    public WhiteStar(Galaxy galaxy) : base("White", galaxy)
    {
    }

    public override float Chances(Random rnd)
    {
        return (3 + Galaxy.Age + Galaxy.Size) * rnd.NextDouble();
    }
}

Of course this can't be the final code but you can use it as hint to organize your code.

Best benefit is that the Galaxy isn't aware of the rules to get a particular type of star, each star type knows its own rules (it means if you add a new star type you won't need to search for rules spanned all around in many classes). Of course this is valid for other classes too (for example if you add a MiddleAge galaxy's age you won't need to update any other class).

Finally don't forget to change the name of the Weight property to something more meaningful for your domain.

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This seems close-ish to what Paolo suggested. I will try your approach as well. Oh goodie, i have so much things to try out :D –  Hammer Dec 16 '12 at 7:18
    
@Hammer, not really similar because approaches are pretty different on purposes. If structure is fixed (it won't change much over time) then Paolo's approach (enum + dictionary) is much shorter (then better because you don't add useless complexity). If it's possible (or probable) it'll change then enums aren't a strong abstraction and you may find it's better to put relevant code in well defined points (not spanning your algorithm all over your classes) even if this implies you'll have to write much more code. –  Adriano Repetti Dec 19 '12 at 9:23
1  
Sorry for the long delay, I've tried out all suggestions and yours seems most close-ish to what I am thinking of. Thanks everyone for the help, again apologies for the long delay :) –  Hammer Jan 6 '13 at 8:37

Why not creating a class hierarchy for your galaxies?

using System.Collections.Generic;

enum StarTypes { Black, White, Yellow, Red };

abstract class Galaxy {
    Dictionary<StarTypes, float> _baseProbabilities;
    protected Galaxy() {
        _baseProbabilities = new Dictionary<StarTypes, float>();
        _baseProbabilities[StarTypes.Black] = 1.0f;
        _baseProbabilities[StarTypes.White] = 3.0f;
    }
    public float GetStarProbability(StarTypes starType) {
        return _baseProbabilities[starType] + GetStarProbabilityModifier(starType);
    }
    protected abstract float GetStarProbabilityModifier(StarTypes starType);
}

class YoungGalaxy : Galaxy {
    protected override float GetStarProbabilityModifier(StarTypes starType) {
        switch (starType) {
        case StarTypes.White:
            return 3.0f;
        default:
            return 0;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, this can work, and it opens up the base for a lot of extending, but also gives quite a lot of overhead. I'll have to experiment with it, since i have a somewhat more complex structure. And i would like to keep working with it simple. Basically everything has a "modifier" chance in appearing in the galaxy, then in the stars, then in the planets/moons. Having different class representing every possible entity type can get a little too much :D –  Hammer Dec 16 '12 at 7:13

Right, so you want to generate random stars but have this weighted based on the age of the galaxy? I'm assuming that you've got these weightings stored somewhere.

So:

Young galaxy. Lets assume:

  1. White star: 40% chance
  2. Yellow star: 40% chance
  3. Red star: 10% chance
  4. Black star: 10% chance

If this is the case then lets build a List and include 4 White and Yellow stars and 1 Red and Black star.

Now, for each star slot lets do the following:

    var start=GetListOfStarsBasedOnGalaxyAge(galaxyAge);
    var starList=new List<StarTypes>();
    for(int starCount=0;starCount<starsInGalaxy,starCount++)
{
    var star=var stars.OrderBy(a => Guid.NewGuid()).First();
 starList.Add(star);
}

Basically we're sorting by random Guids, which is a cheap but effective way of shuffling. This will ensure that your star selection is random but is also using the appropriate weighting you want. You may still get a galaxy filled entirely with Black stars, but it is highly unlikely.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry i've never worked with guids for ordering, ill try out your idea :) –  Hammer Dec 16 '12 at 7:14

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