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Suppose I have a class A as follows:

class A
  class B
  end
  class C < B
  end
  ...
end

And I want to create a class D that has the same nested class structure as A

class D
  Replicate nested class structure of A here
end

I want D to look like:

class D
  class B
  end
  class C < B
  end
  ...
end

So that I can do A::B and D::B with different results

How can I achieve this? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
class Module
  def replicate m
    m.constants.each do |sym|
      case mm = m.const_get(sym)
      when Class then const_set(sym, Class.new(mm.superclass)).replicate(mm)
      when Module then const_set(sym, Module.new(mm.superclass)).replicate(mm)
      end
    end
  end
end

class D
  replicate A
end

But the superclass part may not be correct with this code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is great. –  Benjamin Godlove Dec 14 '12 at 20:05
    
What would happen if D extends A? Suppose I add some methods to shared class B inside class A and B extends A. Will B have the new class definitions? –  Benjamin Godlove Dec 14 '12 at 20:57
    
This looks great for the job! –  musicmatze Dec 16 '12 at 7:49
class A
end
class D
end

[A, D].each do |c|
    c.class_eval %Q(
        class B
            def bar; puts "B#bar in #{c} is not shared" end # <--- new
        end
        class C < B
            def foo; puts "C#foo in #{c}" end
        end
    )
end

p A.constants
p A::C.instance_methods(false)
p D.constants
p D::C.instance_methods(false)
A::C.new.foo
D::C.new.foo

New

A::B.new.bar
D::B.new.bar
=begin
class B # creates a new class B
    def quux; puts "A::B#quux in #{self}" end
end
A::B.new.quux #=> undefined method `quux' for #<A::B:0x101358a98> (NoMethodError)
=end
class A::B # reopens B in A
    def quux; puts "A::B#quux in #{self}" end
end
A::B.new.quux

Execution :

$ ruby -w t.rb 
["B", "C"]
["foo"]
["B", "C"]
["foo"]
C#foo in A
C#foo in D

New

B#bar in A is not shared
B#bar in D is not shared
A::B#quux in #<A::B:0x10402da28>

It's more duplicating than replicating the whole internal structure, including the methods and possible variables. For this you need reflection, or maybe marshall out and in.

New : If you put something in the text inside %Q(), class_eval will evaluate it for each class, hence it is not shared. B is not independent, you have two different classes A::B and D::B.

If you want to add the same code to both classes, create a module and include it. Ruby creates a proxy which points to the module and inserts the proxy in the chain of pointers starting from the class of the object to its superclass, so that the search method mechanism will look for module's methods after methods of the class and before methods in the superclass.

class D
   extend A
end

will define instance methods of A as class (singleton) methods of D. Sounds ugly. I think that you should experiment, display what happens with puts, p, instance_methods, singleton_methods and the like.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. What would happen if D extends A? Suppose I add some methods to shared class B inside class A and B extends A. Will B have the new class definitions? –  Benjamin Godlove Dec 14 '12 at 20:55
    
@user1608871 Please see "New stuff" above. –  user1852994 Dec 14 '12 at 22:50

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