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Is it possible to construct a snippet of code in Java that would make a hypothetical java.lang.ChuckNorrisException uncatchable?

Thoughts that came to mind are using for example interceptors or aspect-oriented programming.

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29  
What can you throw in Java? –  jschoen Dec 14 '12 at 17:12
2  
using the suggestion from the link @jschoen provided (disable the byte code verifier) you can throw something which doesn't extend Throwable! described in my answer below. –  jtahlborn Dec 14 '12 at 17:42
4  
This excerpt from aioobe's answer sums up the question @jschoen linked quite well: "I.e., your question can be interpreted as 'If a JVM deviates from the specification, can it do weird stuff such as throwing primitivs' and the answer is of course, yes." –  Dan Neely Dec 14 '12 at 18:26
2  
@Max - Can you elaborate on practical uses for this? –  Vineet Bhatia Dec 15 '12 at 20:36
3  
how about an exception that rethrow itself on the finalize()? –  Lie Ryan Dec 16 '12 at 8:53
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16 Answers

up vote 235 down vote accepted

I haven't tried this, so I don't know if the JVM would restrict something like this, but maybe you could compile code which throws ChuckNorrisException, but at runtime provide a class definition of ChuckNorrisException which does not extend Throwable.

UPDATE:

It doesn't work. It generates a verifier error:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.VerifyError: (class: TestThrow, method: ma\
in signature: ([Ljava/lang/String;)V) Can only throw Throwable objects
Could not find the main class: TestThrow.  Program will exit.

UPDATE 2:

Actually, you can get this to work if you disable the byte code verifier! (-Xverify:none)

UPDATE 3:

For those following from home, here is the full script:

Create the following classes:

public class ChuckNorrisException
    extends RuntimeException // <- Comment out this line on second compilation
{
    public ChuckNorrisException() { }
}

public class TestVillain {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            throw new ChuckNorrisException();
        }
        catch(Throwable t) {
            System.out.println("Gotcha!");
        }
        finally {
            System.out.println("The end.");
        }
    }
}

Compile classes:

javac -cp . TestVillain.java ChuckNorrisException.java

Run:

java -cp . TestVillain
Gotcha!
The end.

Comment out "extends RuntimeException" and recompile ChuckNorrisException.java only :

javac -cp . ChuckNorrisException.java

Run:

java -cp . TestVillain
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.VerifyError: (class: TestVillain, method: main signature: ([Ljava/lang/String;)V) Can only throw Throwable objects
Could not find the main class: TestVillain.  Program will exit.

Run without verification:

java -Xverify:none -cp . TestVillain
The end.
Exception in thread "main"
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13  
OK, so what if you catch Object instead of Throwable, then? (The compiler won't allow it, but since we've already disabled the verifier, maybe one could hack the bytecode to do it.) –  Ilmari Karonen Dec 14 '12 at 18:40
    
@IlmariKaronen - don't know. i didn't actually have to hack byte code for my test, just recompile a class. –  jtahlborn Dec 14 '12 at 19:12
9  
According to What can you throw in Java you can still catch things that don't extend throwable, but throwing and catching them is undefined behavior. –  VolatileDream Dec 14 '12 at 19:49
8  
@dzieciou They can be true together. You might be able to catch them using your version of the Java environment on your specific version of your operating system on your processor type. But if it's not specified in the standard whether it CAN be caught, it's called undefined behavior, because other implementations of Java might choose to make it non-catchable. –  heinrich5991 Dec 15 '12 at 12:39
1  
@kdgregory - eagerly awaiting your answer... :) –  jtahlborn Jan 1 '13 at 15:53
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After having pondered this, I have successfully created an uncatchable exception. I chose to name it JulesWinnfield, however, rather than Chuck, because it is one mushroom-cloud-laying-mother-exception. Furthermore, it might not be exactly what you had in mind, but it certainly can't be caught. Observe:

public static class JulesWinnfield extends Exception
{
    JulesWinnfield()
    {
        System.err.println("Say 'What' again! I dare you! I double dare you!");
        System.exit(25-17); // And you shall know I am the LORD
    }
}


public static void main(String[] args)
{       
    try
    {
        throw new JulesWinnfield();
    } 
    catch(JulesWinnfield jw)
    {
        System.out.println("There's a word for that Jules - a bum");
    }
}

Et voila! Uncaught exception.

Output:

run:

Say 'What' again! I dare you! I double dare you!

Java Result: 8

BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 0 seconds)

When I have a little more time, I'll see if I can't come up with something else, as well.

Also, check this out:

public static class JulesWinnfield extends Exception
{
    JulesWinnfield() throws JulesWinnfield, VincentVega
    {
        throw new VincentVega();
    }
}

public static class VincentVega extends Exception
{
    VincentVega() throws JulesWinnfield, VincentVega
    {
        throw new JulesWinnfield();
    }
}


public static void main(String[] args) throws VincentVega
{

    try
    {
        throw new JulesWinnfield();
    }
    catch(JulesWinnfield jw)
    {

    }
    catch(VincentVega vv)
    {

    }
}

Causes a stack overflow - again, exceptions remain uncaught.

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19  
+1 for using Stack Overflow in your answer. Just kidding, really good answer. –  Josiah Dec 15 '12 at 23:20
4  
A proper "uncatchable exception" would ensure that all enclosing finally blocks would execute without any intervening catches. Killing the system doesn't throw an exception--it just kills the system. –  supercat Dec 15 '12 at 23:54
2  
How do you "throw" the JulesWinfield? Won't the system come to a screeching halt before it's thrown? –  supercat Dec 16 '12 at 0:25
1  
@mikeTheLiar: The system exits during the constructor, does it not? The statement throw new Whatever() is really two parts: Whatever it = new Whatever(); throw it;, and the system dies before it reaches the second part. –  supercat Dec 16 '12 at 0:40
3  
@mikeTheLiar you actually can catch Jules or Vincent quite easily... if you manage to throw it. It's easy to create an exception that you can't throw: class cn extends exception{private cn(){}} –  Jan Dvorak Dec 18 '12 at 20:55
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With such an exception it would obviously be mandatory to use a System.exit(Integer.MIN_VALUE); from the constructor because this is what would happen if you threw such an exception ;)

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29  
+1; IMO this is the only possible solution. An uncatchable exception is should terminate the program... –  home Dec 14 '12 at 17:15
7  
No, it would not be what happens when you throw such an exception. An uncaught exception will terminate a single thread, it will not exit the jvm, in some contexts System.exit itself will even cause a SecurityException - not every piece of code is allowed to shutdown a program. –  josefx Dec 15 '12 at 18:53
3  
You can use while(true){} instead of System.exit(). –  Banthar Dec 15 '12 at 22:14
2  
actually, you can prevent System.exit() from working by installing a security manager which disallows it. that would turn the constructor into a different exception (SecurityException), which could be caught. –  jtahlborn Dec 16 '12 at 13:21
4  
Umm, technically you never threw an exception. You haven't even constructed the object to throw yet! –  Thomas Eding Dec 18 '12 at 8:14
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Any code can catch Throwable. So no, whatever exception you create is going to be a subclass of Throwable and will be subject to being caught.

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10  
Throwable would hang itself in an attempt to catch ChuckNorrisException :P –  PermGenError Dec 15 '12 at 9:09
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Any exception you throw has to extend Throwable, so it can be always caught. So answer is no.

If you want to make it difficult to handle, you can override methods getCause(), getMessage(), getStackTrace(), toString() to throw another java.lang.ChuckNorrisException.

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1  
Hmm, catch(Throwable t) call any methods or otherwise mutate the object? It may be possible to cause a catch clause to further throw an exception therefor making it impossible. –  Sparksis Dec 14 '12 at 18:33
    
I think catch(Throwable t) only stores it into variable so my suggestions only apply in the next block when user want to cope with the exception –  mirelon Dec 14 '12 at 20:52
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public class ChuckNorrisException extends Exception {
    public ChuckNorrisException() {
        System.exit(1);
    }
}

(Granted, technically this exception is never actually thrown, but a proper ChuckNorrisException can't be thrown -- it throws you first.)

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4  
A colleague of mine had suggested sticking 'for(;;){}' as he felt a 'System.exit(1)' call could throw a Security Exception. I'm voting this one up for creativity! –  Phil Street Dec 18 '12 at 22:00
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My answer is based on @jtahlborn's idea, but it's a fully working Java program, that can be packaged into a JAR file and even deployed to your favorite application server as a part of a web application.

First of all, let's define ChuckNorrisException class so that it doesn't crash JVM from the beginning (Chuck really loves crashing JVMs BTW :)

package chuck;

import java.io.PrintStream;
import java.io.PrintWriter;

public class ChuckNorrisException extends Exception {

    public ChuckNorrisException() {
    }

    @Override
    public Throwable getCause() {
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    public String getMessage() {
        return toString();
    }

    @Override
    public void printStackTrace(PrintWriter s) {
        super.printStackTrace(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void printStackTrace(PrintStream s) {
        super.printStackTrace(s);
    }
}

Now goes Expendables class to construct it:

package chuck;

import javassist.*;

public class Expendables {

    private static Class clz;

    public static ChuckNorrisException getChuck() {
        try {
            if (clz == null) {
                ClassPool pool = ClassPool.getDefault();
                CtClass cc = pool.get("chuck.ChuckNorrisException");
                cc.setSuperclass(pool.get("java.lang.Object"));
                clz = cc.toClass();
            }
            return (ChuckNorrisException)clz.newInstance();
        } catch (Exception ex) {
            throw new RuntimeException(ex);
        }
    }
}

And finally the Main class to kick some butt:

package chuck;

public class Main {

    public void roundhouseKick() throws Exception {
        throw Expendables.getChuck();
    }

    public void foo() {
        try {
            roundhouseKick();
        } catch (Throwable ex) {
            System.out.println("Caught " + ex.toString());
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            System.out.println("before");
            new Main().foo();
            System.out.println("after");
        } finally {
            System.out.println("finally");
        }
    }
}

Compile and run it with following command:

java -Xverify:none -cp .:<path_to_javassist-3.9.0.GA.jar> chuck.Main

You will get following output:

before
finally

No surprise - it's a roundhouse kick after all :)

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very nice! haven't done much with class definition manipulation myself. do you still need the "verify:none" on the commandline? –  jtahlborn Dec 21 '12 at 14:46
    
@jtahlborn Yes, attempt to throw an object not being descendant of Throwable fails without "verify:none". –  Wildfire Dec 22 '12 at 11:51
    
oh, i got the impression this somehow got around that constraint. so how is this different from my answer? –  jtahlborn Dec 22 '12 at 15:03
2  
The main difference is that it's working java code without compile-time hacking –  Wildfire Dec 23 '12 at 10:12
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In the constructor you could start a thread which repeatedly calls originalThread.stop (ChuckNorisException.this)

The thread could catch the exception repeatedly but would keep throwing it until it dies.

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Only way to do it –  Demetri May 9 at 4:09
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No. All exceptions in Java must subclass java.lang.Throwable, and although it may not be good practice, you can catch every type of exception like so:

try {
    //Stuff
} catch ( Throwable T ){
    //Doesn't matter what it was, I caught it.
}

See the java.lang.Throwable documentation for more information.

If you're trying to avoid checked exceptions (ones that must be explicitly handled) then you will want to subclass Error, or RuntimeException.

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The only ChuckNorrisExceptions in Java should be OutOfMemoryError and StackOverflowError.

You can actually "catch" them in the means that a catch(OutOfMemoryError ex) will execute in case the exception is thrown, but that block will automatically rethrow the exception to the caller.

I don't think that public class ChuckNorrisError extends Error does the trick but you could give it a try. I found no documentation about extending Error

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1  
Error still extends Throwable so no way to prevent catching it. That is by design of the Java language. –  JasonM1 Dec 15 '12 at 18:22
1  
@JasonM1 I don't think the OP asked for an actually "uncatchable" exception, and I meant that Error propagates even if you catch it. So, any Throwable is catchable but these two will eventually propagate no matter what you do –  djechelon Dec 15 '12 at 18:36
    
To be tricky ChuckNorrisException could extend Throwable directly then it would be neither Exception nor Error! –  JasonM1 Dec 15 '12 at 19:01
2  
Error does not propagate even if you catch it, i'm not sure where you got that idea. –  jtahlborn Dec 17 '12 at 13:12
1  
I think you are well confused about Erros, they are normal exceptions like everything that extends Throwable or even Throwable, itself. –  bestsss Dec 21 '12 at 10:30
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Is it possible to construct a snippet of code in java that would make a hypothetical java.lang.ChuckNorrisException uncatchable?

Yes, and here's the answer: Design your java.lang.ChuckNorrisException such that it is not an instance of java.lang.Throwable. Why? An unthrowable object is uncatchable by definition because you can never catch something that can never be thrown.

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1  
But then it is not an exception. –  dolbi Dec 18 '12 at 19:47
8  
@dolbi: I can find no place in the OP's question that states java.lang.ChuckNorrisException must be an exception, let alone throwable –  Thomas Eding Dec 18 '12 at 19:57
1  
I guess its not stated, but it is implied. You are a mathematician :-) , aren't you? –  dolbi Dec 20 '12 at 7:48
    
I'm a programmer, but I studied math in school as my primary subject. –  Thomas Eding Dec 20 '12 at 18:36
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You can keep ChuckNorris internal or private and encapsulate him or swollow him...

try { doChuckAction(); } catch(ChuckNorrisException cne) { /*do something else*/ }

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7  
I don't believe the idea was to catch it. I think the idea is to prevent it from being caught. –  Patrick Roberts Dec 15 '12 at 4:43
    
Correct me if I am wrong but if you make it internal you cannot get to it without reflection. –  Jay Dec 15 '12 at 15:23
2  
yes, but as long as you can catch Exception or Throwable the visibility of the actual type is irrelevant. –  KeithS Dec 15 '12 at 16:25
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A variant on the theme is the surprising fact that you can throw undeclared checked exceptions from Java code. Since it is not declared in the methods signature, the compiler won't let you catch the exception itself, though you can catch it as java.lang.Exception.

Here's a helper class that lets you throw anything, declared or not:

public class SneakyThrow {
  public static RuntimeException sneak(Throwable t) {
    throw SneakyThrow.<RuntimeException> throwGivenThrowable(t);
  }

  private static <T extends Throwable> RuntimeException throwGivenThrowable(Throwable t) throws T {
    throw (T) t;
  }
}

Now throw SneakyThrow.sneak(new ChuckNorrisException()); does throw a ChuckNorrisException, but the compiler complains in

try {
  throw SneakyThrow.sneak(new ChuckNorrisException());
} catch (ChuckNorrisException e) {
}

about catching an exception that is not thrown if ChuckNorrisException is a checked exception.

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Two fundamental problems with exception handling in Java are that it uses the type of an exception to indicate whether action should be taken based upon it, and that anything which takes action based upon an exception (i.e. "catch"es it) is presumed to resolve the underlying condition. It would be useful to have a means by which an exception object could decide which handlers should execute, and whether the handlers that have executed so far have cleaned things up enough for the present method to satisfy its exit conditions. While this could be used to make "uncatchable" exceptions, two bigger uses would be to (1) make exceptions which will only be considered handled when they're caught by code that actually knows how to deal with them, and (2) allow for sensible handling of exceptions which occur in a finally block (if a FooException during a finally block during the unwinding of a BarException, both exceptions should propagate up the call stack; both should be catchable, but unwinding should continue until both have been caught). Unfortunately, I don't think there would be any way to make existing exception-handling code work that way without breaking things.

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an interesting idea, but i don't think the low-level code would know what a particular exception "means" to the caller, so i don't think it would ever make sense for the thrower to decide which handlers should execute. –  jtahlborn Dec 16 '12 at 13:24
    
@jtahlborn: Right now, the thrower decides what exception handlers should execute via the choice of exception type. This makes it all but impossible to handle some scenarios cleanly. Among other things: (1) if an exception occurs while a finally block is cleaning up from an earlier exception, it's quite possible that either exception, in the absence of the other, may be something which code would be expect to handle and continue on, but that handling one and ignoring the other would be bad. There's no mechanism, though, to produce a composite exception that both handlers would process. –  supercat Dec 16 '12 at 20:10
    
@jtahlborn: Also, it makes it makes it very difficult to allow exceptions that occur within callbacks to be handled by the outer application layer. If the callback's exception is wrapped in another exception type, the type of callback exception cannot be used in the outer layer in deciding whether to catch it; if it isn't wrapped, an "accidental" mid-layer exception may be mistaken for one that occurs in the callback. If a wrapped exception object were told when it was passed up to the outer application layer, it could then start answering to the types of the wrapped exceptions. –  supercat Dec 16 '12 at 20:15
    
i wasn't arguing your other points, just the statement about the exception object deciding on which handlers will execute. to some extent exception types do that already, but it sounds like you wanted something more dynamic, which i was disagreeing with. i think your major argument (which you are kind of coming at sideways) is to capture as much information as you can at the bottom and let the upper layers see and work with all of that information. on this general point i agree with you, however the devil is in the details/implementation. –  jtahlborn Dec 16 '12 at 20:32
    
@jtahlborn: My intention was not to have the virtual methods implement anything particularly "dynamic", but essentially say "Is there a condition of the indicated type which should be acted upon". One thing I forgot to mention, though, is that there should be a means via which code which calls Foo can distinguish between an exception which Foo either threw itself or deliberately wants to pretend it threw itself, from one which Foo was not expecting to occur when it was calling some other method. That's what the notion of "checked" exceptions should be "about". –  supercat Dec 16 '12 at 20:55
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Call System.exit(1) in the finalize, and just throw a copy of the exception from all the other methods, so that the program will exit.

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Actually the accepted answer is not so nice because Java needs to be run without verification, i.e. the code would not work under normal circumstances.

AspectJ to the rescue for the real solution!

Exception class:

package de.scrum_master.app;

public class ChuckNorrisException extends RuntimeException {
    public ChuckNorrisException(String message) {
        super(message);
    }
}

Aspect:

package de.scrum_master.aspect;

import de.scrum_master.app.ChuckNorrisException;

public aspect ChuckNorrisAspect {
    before(ChuckNorrisException chuck) : handler(*) && args(chuck) {
        System.out.println("Somebody is trying to catch Chuck Norris - LOL!");
        throw chuck;
    }
}

Sample application:

package de.scrum_master.app;

public class Application {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        catchAllMethod();
    }

    private static void catchAllMethod() {
        try {
            exceptionThrowingMethod();
        }
        catch (Throwable t) {
            System.out.println("Gotcha, " + t.getClass().getSimpleName() + "!");
        }
    }

    private static void exceptionThrowingMethod() {
        throw new ChuckNorrisException("Catch me if you can!");
    }
}

Output:

Somebody is trying to catch Chuck Norris - LOL!
Exception in thread "main" de.scrum_master.app.ChuckNorrisException: Catch me if you can!
    at de.scrum_master.app.Application.exceptionThrowingMethod(Application.java:18)
    at de.scrum_master.app.Application.catchAllMethod(Application.java:10)
    at de.scrum_master.app.Application.main(Application.java:5)
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protected by NickLarsen Dec 15 '12 at 13:30

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