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I am trying to scan documents and identify where sections of the document begin and end. Sometimes, the document has a table of contents that lists page numbers I do not want to capture the TOC because it does not identify part of the document. I have been messing with this for sometime and am stuck on something. I can't seem to avoid capturing the lines from the table of contents with line numbers

Here is the regular expression

verbose_item_pattern_3 = re.compile(r"""
  ^            # begin match at newline
  \t*          # 0-or-more tabspace
  [ ]*         # 0-or-more blank space
  I            # a capital I
  [tT][eE][mM] # one character from each of the three sets this allows for unknown case
  \t*          # 0-or-more tabspace
  [ ]*         # 0-or-more blankspace
  \d{1,2}      # 1-or-2 digits
  [.]?         # 0-or-1 literal .
  \(?          # 0-or-1 literal open paren
  [a-e]?       # 0-or-1 letter in the range a-e
  \)?          # 0-or-1 closing paren
  .*           # any number of unknown characters so we can have words and punctuation
  [^0-9]       # anything but [0-9]
  $           # 1 newline character
  """, re.VERBOSE|re.MULTILINE)

here is an example of a line I DO NOT want to capture

test_string='\nItem 6.       TITLE ITEM 6..................................................25\n'

Here is an example of what I do want to capture

test_string='\nItem 6.       TITLE ITEM 6 maybe other words here who knows  \n'

But when I run

re.findall(verbose_item_pattern_3,test_string)

the result is

['Item 6.       TITLE ITEM 6..................................................25\n']

Now the thing to me that is interesting is that if my test string is this

test_string='PART I\nItem 1.       TITLE ITEM 1...................................................1\nItem 2.       TITLE ITEM 2..................................................21\n'

and run that with re.findall(verbose_item_pattern_3,test_string)

the result is closer to what I want but still not correct

['Item 2.       TITLE ITEM 2..................................................21\n']

There should not be anything captured

share|improve this question
    
Note how the newline is captured.. –  Martijn Pieters Dec 14 '12 at 17:13
1  
Could you explain why your example should not be captured? What shouldn't be matching? –  acjay Dec 14 '12 at 17:14
    
I can't seem to understand what the desired output should be. It would be much more helpful to see a more inclusive snippet of source input, show what it is doing wrong, and showing what it should be doing instead. –  jdi Dec 14 '12 at 17:17
    
I am trying to not capture any line that ends with a number Hpefully I clarified it above –  PyNEwbie Dec 14 '12 at 17:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your regex matches because of three things.

  1. most of it is optional, so it is very unspecific
  2. there is a .* that eats the entire line, so your last condition [^0-9] will never come to bear, and that's because:
  3. the newline character itself fulfills [^0-9], so the [^0-9] can successfully match even though the line ends in a number.

The minimal change would be to use a negative look-behind at the end:

verbose_item_pattern_3 = re.compile(r"""
  ^            # start-of-line
  \t*          # 0-or-more tabspace
  [ ]*         # 0-or-more blank space
  I            # a capital I
  [tT][eE][mM] # one character from each of the three sets this allows for unknown case
  \t*          # 0-or-more tabspace
  [ ]*         # 0-or-more blankspace
  \d{1,2}      # 1-or-2 digits
  [.]?         # 0-or-1 literal .
  \(?          # 0-or-1 literal open paren
  [a-e]?       # 0-or-1 letter in the range a-e
  \)?          # 0-or-1 closing paren
  .*           # any number of unknown characters so we can have words and punctuation
  $            # end-of-line
  (?<![0-9])   # NOT preceded by a decimal digit (via look-behind)
  """, re.VERBOSE|re.MULTILINE)

Note that neither the ^ not the $ actually match a newline character. They match the position right after (^) or the position right before ($) a newline character. The newline character itself is never part of the match.

I've changed their comments to the more precise start-of-line and end-of-line for that reason.

Also note how I can apply a negative look-behind even after the $. Doing it this way is useful to prevent backtracking, making the regex faster.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks so much I was trying to get my head around negative look-behind and this example makes it very clear. Both answers were very helpful you got accepted because you were first thanks –  PyNEwbie Dec 14 '12 at 17:49
    
Sorry I changed the title to make it easier for the next lost soul find the right answer and that caused your answer to get unmarked I just realized that and marked it again I did not know that was how SO worked –  PyNEwbie Dec 14 '12 at 20:15
    
@PyNew Not to worry, oll is well! –  Tomalak Dec 14 '12 at 20:50

If I understand correctly, you expect your example strings to not match because the last character in the line is a digit, and your regex ends with [^0-9]$.

The reason this is behaving incorrectly is that $ will match just before a \n, but also at the very end of the string. What ends up happening here is that the .* matches the digits, then [^0-9] matches the \n, and $ matches at the end of the string. Consider the following example which uses capturing groups to show how this works:

>>> re.match(r'(.*)([^0-9])$', '...12\n').groups()
('...12', '\n')

To fix this, you can prevent [^0-9] from matching line break characters by changing it to [^0-9\n]:

verbose_item_pattern_3 = re.compile(r"""
  ^            # begin match at newline
  \t*          # 0-or-more tabspace
  [ ]*         # 0-or-more blank space
  I            # a capital I
  [tT][eE][mM] # one character from each of the three sets this allows for unknown case
  \t*          # 0-or-more tabspace
  [ ]*         # 0-or-more blankspace
  \d{1,2}      # 1-or-2 digits
  [.]?         # 0-or-1 literal .
  \(?          # 0-or-1 literal open paren
  [a-e]?       # 0-or-1 letter in the range a-e
  \)?          # 0-or-1 closing paren
  .*           # any number of unknown characters so we can have words and punctuation
  [^0-9\n]     # anything but [0-9] and line breaks
  $           # 1 newline character
  """, re.VERBOSE|re.MULTILINE)

Examples (using above regex):

>>> verbose_item_pattern_3.findall('\nItem 6.       TITLE ITEM 6.....25\n')
[]
>>> verbose_item_pattern_3.findall('\nItem 6.       TITLE ITEM 6.....\n')
['Item 6.       TITLE ITEM 6.....']
share|improve this answer
    
+1 That's an even more minimal change than my version. Strange that I did not think of that. –  Tomalak Dec 14 '12 at 17:36
    
@FJ Thanks a lot this was very helpful and helps me better understand how to work with regular expressions. The only reason you did not get the accepted answer is because I think Tomalak beat you by seconds and his answer also helped me better understand what I was doing wrong –  PyNEwbie Dec 14 '12 at 17:51

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