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Here is what I want to do:

I have an interface Service as follows:

public interface Service<A extends Object, R extends Object> {
    R run(A a);
}

Now, I want to link two such services, while keeping it generic:

public class Link<A, R> implements Service<A, R> {

    private Service<A, X> s1; // fail
    private Service<X, R> s2; // fail

    public <X> Link(Service<A, X> s1, Service<X, R> s2) {
        this.s1 = s1;
        this.s2 = s2;
    }

    @Override
    public R run(A a) {
        return s2.run(s1.run(a));
    }
}

The problem that I want to address is to assign a generic type X to class Link, but I want that to be inferred through its constructor and not through the class declaration.

How is it achievable?

Edit:

The way I've solved this is by a utility static method which does the linking process:

public static <A, I, R> Service<A, R> link(final Service<A, I> s1, final Service<I, R> s2) {
    return new Service<A, R>() {
        @Override
        public R run(A a) throws Exception {
            I intermediate = s1.run(a);
            return s2.run(intermediate);
        }
    };
}
share|improve this question
6  
FWIW, the "extends Object" in you generic type definitions are redundant. –  Tom McIntyre Dec 14 '12 at 17:20
    
Ya, I was experimenting with <? extends Object> etc. and I forgot to remove that. –  koikahin Dec 14 '12 at 17:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You cannot have a generic type X that is part of your class (not selected anew for each method call) that is not part of its declaration.

Sure, you could hide the unsafe casts and be certain your program would work, but those are really your only two options in the limitations of Java's type system.

What I would do, though, is instead of providing a Link constructor, provide the static factory method

public static <A, X, R> Service<A, R> link(Service<A, X> s1, Service<X, R> s2) {
  return new Link<A, X, R>(s1, s2);
}

...ensuring that X is automatically inferred and never escapes.

share|improve this answer
    
That does make sense. But then how do I achieve what I intend to achieve? –  koikahin Dec 14 '12 at 17:21
1  
I gave you your two options. Accept the use of unsafe casts, or accept that X has to go in your class declaration. Those are your options. –  Louis Wasserman Dec 14 '12 at 17:22
    
I added a sort of third option that comes closer to what you'd probably want. –  Louis Wasserman Dec 14 '12 at 17:28
    
the third one is what I really wanted to achieve, and I was planning something very similar to that too. But I thought that maybe I am missing something. Thanks for your answer. –  koikahin Dec 14 '12 at 17:59
    
this should probably be a static method –  newacct Dec 14 '12 at 22:33

This will work:

public class Link<A, R, X> implements Service<A, R> {

    private Service<A, X> s1; 
    private Service<X, R> s2; 

    public Link(Service<A, X> s1, Service<X, R> s2) {
        this.s1 = s1;
        this.s2 = s2;
    }

    @Override
    public R run(A a) {
       return s2.run(s1.run(a));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The point of the OP's question was that the OP wanted to avoid declaring class Link<A, R, X>, keeping the type just Link<A, R>, but that's impossible. –  Louis Wasserman Dec 14 '12 at 17:41

For better covariance you could adjust the above answers like this:

public class Link <F, X, T>  implements Service <F, T> {
    private final Service<F, ? extends X> from;
    private final Service <X, ? extends T> to;

    public Link(Service <F, ? extends X> from, Service <X, ? extends T> to) {
        this.from = from;
        this.to = to;
    }

    @Override
    public T run (F input) {
        return to.run (from.run (input));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The more important point is this: When I am linking multiple of them, I don't want to track the intermediate X, because it adds unnecessary complexity, and, well, I shouldn't need to. But this is nice! I was expecting more on the lines of this, but unfortunately this isn't perfect either :( Btw, the answer deserves a Vote up (though I don't have the right to do it yet) –  koikahin Dec 15 '12 at 4:02

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