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I wanted to know in each couple of loop code ,whether some version consumes less memory than the second one, and if it's true that in some versions we allocated new space for variable each loop cycle.
Note: 2 is pretty obvious, 1 and 3 are more interesting..

1.

While(!exit)
{
  int x = 5;
}

Versus:

int x= 0;
While(!exit)
{
  x = 5;
}

Same question for reference types:
2.

While(!exit)
{
      Point p = new Point();
      p.x = 5;
}

Versus:

Point p = new Point();
While(!exit)
{   
      p.x = 5;
}

3. Reference type without allocation similar to 1?:

While(!exit)
{   
      Point p = point1;
}  

Versus:

Point p = null;
While(!exit)  
{   
   p = point1;
}  
share|improve this question
    
I would assume compiler would optimize it for you either way. –  Khan Dec 14 '12 at 17:21
8  
For all practical purposes, it's not going to matter. Use scoping as the basis for your variable declaration decisions, not performance. –  Robert Harvey Dec 14 '12 at 17:21
    
BTW: Point is struct, so value type. –  L.B Dec 14 '12 at 17:27
    
Assume Point was written by me and that it is a class –  JavaSa Dec 14 '12 at 17:29
    
Whether it's a value type (struct) or reference type (class), is not relevant to the question. Both cases have storage requirements. In the case of a value type, the storage requirement is the type's full storage requirement. In the case of a reference type, the storage requirement is a reference (4 bytes for x86 or 8 bytes for x64). –  Tergiver Dec 14 '12 at 17:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The compiler decides how many stack storage locations your function needs and will do what it can to reduce that need. Something like:

{
   int a;
   ...
}
{
   int b;
   ...
}

Seems to require two storage locations, but the compiler can see that the first is never used outside the first scope and can re-use the location for b.

It may also see that it can do away with the stack storage all together and perform the whole thing in registers.

Whether looping or not, a single variable declaration defines a single storage location. It would never be the case that a new storage location would get created for each iteration of the loop.

In general, this is not something you need to be concerned with.

Note that "debug" builds might produce separate storage locations on the stack for every variable declared to make viewing those variables while debugging easier.

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It doesnt matter. The compiler optimises it, so it stays the same. It should not affect performance at all, in compiled languages like c#. In Java, for example, it is better to declare only once.

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The proper way to tell is to disassemble it, and look at the code. You'll see references to each.

Link to MSDN way to do it: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/f7dy01k1.aspx

The code is pretty readable in CIL. Just search for function name, you'll see the call to new and such.

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Optimiaztions on C# tend to be made at the jitter level, not the IL level. On top of that, this isn't actually answering the question. –  Servy Dec 14 '12 at 17:34

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