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My code doesn't terminate on a true condition if called from another method. For example,

void RunValidation()
{
    if (NameEntered == string.Empty)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("No name has been entered");
        return;
    }
}

void CreateUser()
{
    RunValidation();

    //Run more code
}

If I call the validation method inside the create user method, the messagebox shows up but the rest of the code gets executed even though "return" was specified.

If the validation code is not inside a method and called directly in the CreateUser method, the rest of the code doesn't run (which is what I want). I want to be able to call a validation method inside many other methods and if the conditions are true, to stop executing other code in the methods.

What is the correct way of doing this? Do I have to use some sort of try and catch?

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You have not closed the RunValidation() function properly. –  arunlalam Dec 14 '12 at 18:15
1  
@arunlalam looks closed to me –  Woot4Moo Dec 14 '12 at 18:17
    
My bad. I thought I saw a quote missing. –  arunlalam Dec 14 '12 at 18:22
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are returning from the RunValidation method, not the CreateUser method. If you want to control the flow of the CreateUser method based on the results of RunValidation, do something like this:

bool Validate()
{
    if (NameEntered.Equals(string.Empty))
    {
        MessageBox.Show("No name has been entered");
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

void CreateUser()
{
    if (Validate())
    {
        // Run more code
    }
}

The return statement only affects the current method. Read more about the return statement here.

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This somewhat works. I would then have to check if Validate() == true. Then the code functions properly. But using this method means adding more lines of code and an extra if else statement. –  MCSharp Dec 14 '12 at 18:37
    
Validate() evaluates to a bool, so you don't need to check Validate() == true unless you want it for readability purposes. This isn't an "extra if else statement" - it's a necessary if-else statement. return functions within the method in which it's called only. –  zimdanen Dec 14 '12 at 18:53
1  
To prevent indented code in the if block, you can just use: if (!Validate()) return; // Run more code –  comecme Dec 14 '12 at 19:19
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return; exits the RunValidation() method.
It has no effect on the function that called it.

Instead, you should make RunValidation() return a boolean indicating whether the validation succeeded.
In the calling method, you can check if it returns false and return; from there too.

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you can do something like:

bool RunValidation()
{
    if (NameEntered == string.Empty)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("No name has been entered");
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

void CreateUser()
{
    if(RunValidation())
    {

        //Run more code
     }
}
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U talking about this code block?

void RunValidation()
{
    if (NameEntered == string.Empty)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("No name has been entered");
        return;
    }
}

because if you are, I don't know what "rest of code" it's executing, because there is no code after the return statement.

If you're talking about this

void CreateUser()
{
    RunValidation();

    //Run more code
}

then yes, just because RunValidation had a return statement doesn't mean that it's calling method will return. that kind of behavior would cause crazy bugs.


Now, in order to achieve yoru expected behavior, you can change runValidation to

bool RunValidation()
{
    if (NameEntered == string.Empty)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("No name has been entered");
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

and then call it like

void CreateUser()
{
    if(RunValidation())
    {

        //Run more code
    }
}
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