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I have question about string in perl. I want to read string, until I see space. In other words: assume that, we have file like this:

time:11/01/12 00:00:00
type:table_dump_v2/ipv4_unicast
prefix:0.0.0.0/0
sequence:0
from:96.4.0.55 as11686
originated:IGP
aspath:11686 19151

time:11/01/12 00:00:00
type:table_dump_v2/ipv4_unicast
prefix:1.0.0.0/24
sequence:1
from:80.91.255.62 as1299
originated:IGP
aspath:1299 15169

and so on. I want to get all of information about 96.4.0.55 in all of my file. I have this IP more than one in my file. I mean I want all of line for this IP, until I see space. And after reaching space, I don't continue to save result.

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closed as not a real question by Wooble, Andy Lester, Joel Berger, friedo, Jon Lin Dec 15 '12 at 0:26

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What have you tried? –  Wooble Dec 14 '12 at 18:25
2  
If you have a question, you should ask it. –  melpomene Dec 14 '12 at 18:27
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3 Answers

You can do this with regex. Assuming that the string is in $_, the line s/ .*// should remove everything after the space.

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I'm not sure whether this will be faster or slower than Andy Lester's solution. Though for such a small case the difference is probably impossible to notice. –  Kyle Strand Dec 14 '12 at 18:29
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If what you want is to have each record, (separated by a blank line), that matches your IP, then the following will save each matching record in the @data array.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @data;

{
    local $/ = "";
    while (<DATA>) {
        if (/^from:96\.4\.0\.55/m) {
            chomp;
            push @data, { split /(?<=[[:alpha:]]):|\n/ };
        }
    }
}
use Data::Dumper; print Dumper \@data;

__DATA__
time:11/01/12 00:00:00
type:table_dump_v2/ipv4_unicast
prefix:0.0.0.0/0
sequence:0
from:96.4.0.55 as11686
originated:IGP
aspath:11686 19151

time:11/01/12 00:00:00
type:table_dump_v2/ipv4_unicast
prefix:1.0.0.0/24
sequence:1
from:80.91.255.62 as1299
originated:IGP
aspath:1299 15169

time:11/01/12 00:00:00
type:table_dump_v2/ipv4_unicast
prefix:1.0.0.0/24
sequence:1
from:96.4.0.55 as1299
originated:IGP
aspath:1299 15169

And this prints:

C:\Old_Data\perlp>perl t1.pl
$VAR1 = [
          {
            'sequence' => '0',
            'aspath' => '11686 19151',
            'from' => '96.4.0.55 as11686',
            'time' => '11/01/12 00:00:00',
            'type' => 'table_dump_v2/ipv4_unicast',
            'originated' => 'IGP',
            'prefix' => '0.0.0.0/0'
          },
          {
            'sequence' => '1',
            'aspath' => '1299 15169',
            'from' => '96.4.0.55 as1299',
            'time' => '11/01/12 00:00:00',
            'type' => 'table_dump_v2/ipv4_unicast',
            'originated' => 'IGP',
            'prefix' => '1.0.0.0/24'
          }
        ];
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The way you break apart a string in Perl is with the split function.

my @parts = split( / /, $string );

Note that you're splitting on a regular expression, not a string.

For more, use perldoc

perldoc -f split
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Not what OP is actually asking, although it's so hard to tell that it's probably not worth answering. –  Wooble Dec 14 '12 at 18:36
    
I think it's part of what he's asking. –  Andy Lester Dec 14 '12 at 18:50
    
(not my downvote, btw) I think by "space" he means "blank line". –  Wooble Dec 14 '12 at 18:53
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