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this code does not compile but i don't why, also the typeid() function can take int as input parameter so the problem must be related to the template mechanism but i don't get the rationale behind this fail.

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

template<typename T> void func(T)
{
  std::cout << typeid(T).name() << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
  func(int);  
  return(0);
}

What is wrong with this template/code ?

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int is not an int. int is a type (not a value). 0 is an int. –  melpomene Dec 14 '12 at 18:49
    
BTW, don't use std::endl. If you really mean to flush the output, use std::flush. –  Dietmar Kühl Dec 14 '12 at 18:58
    
@DietmarKühl because it slows down the terminal output or for other reasons ? –  user1849534 Dec 14 '12 at 19:03
    
Yes. Unnecessary use of std::endl causes performance problems. People using it as a default will introduce problems which may involve a lot if changes to solve them. –  Dietmar Kühl Dec 14 '12 at 19:06
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to pass an instance of type int, not the type itself:

func(int());
        ^^ note the parentheses

If you don't want to pass an instance around, you could change your code like so:

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

template<typename T> void func()
{
  std::cout << typeid(T).name() << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
  func<int>();
  return(0);
}
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1  
how to pass a type and not an instance ? templates can only abstract instances ? –  user1849534 Dec 14 '12 at 18:51
    
@user1849534: See the edit. –  NPE Dec 14 '12 at 18:53
    
thanks, now it works :) –  user1849534 Dec 14 '12 at 18:55
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You have to pass some "instance" of type int ... not just type itself...

func(int(123));

will be ok

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4  
The cast isn't needed. 123 has type int. –  Pete Becker Dec 14 '12 at 18:51
    
Just to demonstrate constructor-like form of "instantiation" of int type :) –  zaufi Dec 14 '12 at 18:53
    
it works but it will create an useless object of type int adding an unwanted overhead to the program :! better use func<int>() in my case. thanks for the reply anyway. –  user1849534 Dec 14 '12 at 19:01
    
FYI, int() would create a default initialized int... guess the value :) –  zaufi Dec 14 '12 at 22:47
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There is nothing wrong with the trmplate code but

func(int);

isn't valid. You probably meant

func(int());
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yes but int() is a constructor meaning that I always have to call an instance creating an object of type int on the fly. What about passing just the type keyword ? –  user1849534 Dec 14 '12 at 18:53
    
If you don't want to create an object your function shouldn't take an argument. If it doesn't take an argument the template type can't be deduced and you'd call the function like this: func<int>(). –  Dietmar Kühl Dec 14 '12 at 18:56
    
how this signature is called ? what kind of call is func<int>() ? –  user1849534 Dec 14 '12 at 18:59
    
It's a function call, calling a function template with an explicitly specified template argument. func is a function template, func<int> is an instantiation of a function template. –  Dietmar Kühl Dec 14 '12 at 19:03
    
ok, I was thinking about a particular explicit template call with a special name; thanks. –  user1849534 Dec 14 '12 at 19:04
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If you want to explicitly instantiate and call your function with T set to int, you have to pass that int as a template argument: foo<int>.

This does not excuse you from supplying the "ordinary" argument, since you declared your function with one "ordinary" parameter of type T.

So, valid calls to foo with explicitly specified template argument might look as follows

foo<int>(0);
foo<int>(true);
foo<int>('a');

(the purpose of explicit specification of template argument is to override the template argument deduction mechanism).

If your intent was to keep that "ordinary" parameter as a fictive one (since you didn't even bother to give it a name), you can supply it with a default argument

template<typename T> void func(T = T())
{
  std::cout << typeid(T).name() << std::endl;
}

in which case your function will become callable as

foo<int>();

Or you can get rid of the ordinary parameter entirely (since you are not using it inside the function anyway)

template<typename T> void func()
{
  std::cout << typeid(T).name() << std::endl;
}

albeit this will force you to always specify the template argument explicitly.

If you had something else in mind, you have to explain what it is.

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1  
foo<int>(); is equivalent to foo<int>(0); ? –  user1849534 Dec 14 '12 at 18:56
1  
No. foo<int>() assumes that foo() can be called without arguments. –  Dietmar Kühl Dec 14 '12 at 19:00
    
@user1849534: Huh? For the OP's declaration of foo, foo<int>() is NOT equivalent to foo<int>(0). foo<int>() is simply invalid. The function argument is required and cannot be omitted. –  AndreyT Dec 14 '12 at 19:00
    
func<int>() works on g++-4.7 with no problems ... it's a valid call apparently –  user1849534 Dec 14 '12 at 19:02
    
@user1849534: Just because something "works" in g++ does not mean it is valid. Gcc compilers are not exactly known as pillars of standard compliance (at least with their default settings). Although it find it hard to believe that this compiles in g++. This sort of "extension" would break a lot of code. Are you sure your definition of foo is the same as in the OP's code? –  AndreyT Dec 14 '12 at 19:09
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