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I've managed to solve the issue, but I want help understanding it because I don't like the solution.

I have a WCF service that makes a HttpWebRequest to a Azure REST API service. However when this line of code is called

HttpWebResponse response = (HttpWebResponse) request.GetResponse();

A 403 Forbidden error is returned. The content length is 0 and both the error code and description say "Forbidden".

Now if I copy my code into a console application it works fine. So this lead me to believe that it came down to permissions within the Application Pool Identity.

Sure enough if I change the identity of the application pool to myself, my code starts to work.

My question is how can I grant permissions to the built-in ApplicationPoolIdentity account so I can execute an HttpWebRequest?

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1 Answer 1

The issue is most probably due to user settings not being available to the ApplicationPoolIdentity user.

I have tested a WCF method that creates a WebRequest and works both when the service is self-hosted as a console application AND when it is hosted under IIS using the ApplicationPoolIdentity

I have tested it on a Windows 7 machine.

One possible setting that could cause the problem may be the HTTP proxy, commonly used in corporate environments.

If there is a proxy setting for your logged-in user you could try to:

1.Set the Proxy property of the WebRequest programmatically.

See here for documentation.

OR

2. Set the proxy to be used by setting the defaultProxy element in the Web.config

See here for documentation.

Hope this helps

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Thanks for the information, I'll give this a try and see what happens. –  Matt Jan 7 '13 at 22:15

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