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Just as I was starting to get familiar with interfaces, I came across a stumbling block with abstract classes. In my understanding, they can be used to provide some functionality for subclasses, but forces subclasses to specify undefined functions (if there are any left).

All the examples I came across however only dealt with functionality that could have been static - no reference to instance variables.

I'm trying to hide some common functions like getName() in the abstract class, but be able to define said name in the subclass.

public interface Application {
    public String getName();
}

/**
 * Specify some default behaviour to keep leaf classes free of common code
 */
public abstract class DefaultApplication implements Application {
    public static final String NAME = "DefApp";

    @Override
    public String getName() {
        return NAME;
    }
}

public class MyApp extends DefaultApplication {
    public static final String NAME = "My App";
}

// Main class
Application myApp = new MyApp();
System.out.println(myApp.getName()); // Prints "DefApp"

I thought that protected String name might work, but this also returns the instance variable in the abstract class. Is the only solution to redefine getName() in each subclass? I wouldn't have minded so much, but this isn't the only case where I'm trying to siphon off methods into the abstract class.

Thanks!

EDIT:
if it's relevant (to suggest other approaches I could consider), Application is a plugin api, and MyApp is an example application provided. DefaultApplication is part of the base project.

share|improve this question
    
Statics don't inherit like you think they do, they shadow. You could call a getter. –  Dave Newton Dec 14 '12 at 21:29
    
if it's relevant (to suggest other approaches I could consider), Application is a plugin api, and MyApp is an example application provided. DefaultApplication is part of the base project. –  ataulm Dec 14 '12 at 21:29
1  
(And edit the question, don't add additional information as comments, where it might be missed.) –  Dave Newton Dec 14 '12 at 21:29
    
why is the field static? should all instances have the same name? –  Peter Lawrey Dec 14 '12 at 21:31
1  
@PeterLawrey I would have preferred not to, as there can be multiple instances of an Application, but as per Thomas's answer below, it shouldn't matter too much as there will definitely not be more than 10 or so instances running at once –  ataulm Dec 14 '12 at 21:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You cannot override anything that's static. Static methods do not belong to a particular object, but belong to the class itself instead; when you write return NAME, the compiler reads this as return DefaultApplication.NAME.

In this case, you can either override getName() in each subclass as you already came up with, or you can make the field non-static, and do something like this:

abstract class DefaultApplication implements Application {
  private final String name;

  protected DefaultApplication(String name) {
    this.name = name;
  }

  protected DefaultApplication() {
    this("DefApp");
  }

  public String getName() {
    return name;
  }
}

class MyApp extends DefaultApplication {

  public MyApp() {
    super("My App");
  }

}

This will add an extra field to every instance of DefaultApplication but as long as you don't have millions of them, that shouldn't really matter.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think what you want is "class MyApp extends DefaultApplication", etc. And I don't understand why you say "This will add an extra field to every instance of DefaultApplication", OP wants a name field in each instance, and there is (only) one defined. –  arcy Dec 14 '12 at 21:42
    
Every instance of DefaultApplication would have a name field, even if they're all identical. This takes up 4 bytes of memory per instance. If it's static, only one such field exists globally. –  Thomas Dec 14 '12 at 21:46
1  
I see. I was assuming he wanted the potential to have a different name in each class, at least, if not each instance. T'wasn't necessarily so, though. –  arcy Dec 14 '12 at 21:52
    
afaict, I retain the ability to have a different name in each class (extending DefaultApplication), but just not each instance (of MyApp). –  ataulm Dec 14 '12 at 21:54

The annotations idea interested me, so I figured I'd throw this out here. Here's a really complicated and not exactly recommended way of printing "My App":

import java.lang.annotation.Inherited;
import java.lang.annotation.Retention;
import java.lang.annotation.RetentionPolicy;

interface Application {
    public String getName();
}

@Inherited
@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@interface ApplicationName {
  String value();
}

@ApplicationName("DefApp")
abstract class DefaultApplication implements Application {
    @Override
    public String getName() {
        return getClass().getAnnotation(ApplicationName.class).value();
    }
}

@ApplicationName("My App")
class MyApp extends DefaultApplication {
}

public class Main {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Application myApp = new MyApp();
    System.out.println(myApp.getName());
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Appreciate this one Thomas. I'm not familiar with annotation much either, and it's used in the project I've inherited (n.p.i.) - this example is clear. –  ataulm Dec 14 '12 at 22:28

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