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I am trying to implement Prims algorithm to find minimum spanning trees of a given graph. The code now compiles, but the executable (instead of printing the MST) prints "segmentation fault:11". Moreover, I get a warning, :

Warning: control reaches end of non-void function

Is anybody able to help me understand what's wrong with it? Thanks in advance.

double Graph::getWeight(int v, int w)
{
    if(edge(v,w))
    {
        Node* t = adj[v];
        while(t != NULL)
        {
            t = t->next;
            if((t ->v) == w)
            return t->weight;
        }
    }
}
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1  
Warnings are logical errors. Fix them. –  Loki Astari Dec 14 '12 at 21:52
    
try using a debugger to pinpoint what is exactly wrong. You can start by searching for gdb. –  axiom Dec 14 '12 at 21:52
    
Do they prevent the program to execute correctly? –  angry_pacifist Dec 14 '12 at 21:54
    
Segmentation fault usually means dereferencing an invalid pointer (usually a NULL). This some more defensive programming and checking if your pointers are NULL would probably be appropriate. Otherwise start it up in a debugger and see where it is actually crashing. –  Loki Astari Dec 14 '12 at 22:18

3 Answers 3

The warning is referring to the fact that your getWeight function says it will return a double but actually only returns a double under certain conditions. If either if statement is false (that is, if edge(v,1) is false or if t->v == w is always false), then the function doesn't return anything.

Perhaps you want to return some default value if the conditions are not true.

Whether that is the cause of your segmentation fault is a different matter.

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1  
+1 - I was just about to submit essentially the same answer & you beat me! –  phonetagger Dec 14 '12 at 21:54
    
Returning a default value still gives "Segmentation fault:11" –  angry_pacifist Dec 14 '12 at 22:00
    
@angry_pacifist This question has been edited to only ask about the warning. If the segmentation fault is still occurring, ask another question, but before you do so, please try and figure out where it is happening in your code. You can do this with the "print stuff everywhere" technique until you realise where the code stops, or using a debugger like gdb. –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 14 '12 at 22:02
    
@sftrabbit Thanks. Where can I find more info about the "print stuff everywhere"? –  angry_pacifist Dec 14 '12 at 22:07
    
@angry_pacifist I was just giving a colloquial name to sticking std::cout << "It reaches here!" << std::endl in your code to find out where your code reaches. You can also print out values to check that they are as you expect. It should help you narrow down where the segmentation fault happens. –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 14 '12 at 22:11

If I understand correctly, your function tries to retrieve the weight of a given edge between vertices v and w. If that edge doesn't exist, or if the weight between them isn't present in the graph data, the function doesn't return anything.

Even if you know that your data structure will be well formed, you should ensure that the code manipulating it can react to bad data.

#include <exception>
#include <string>

/* ... */

double Graph::getWeight(int v, int w)
{
    if(edge(v,w))
    {
        Node* t = adj[v];
        while(t != NULL)
        {
            t = t->next;
            if((t ->v) == w)
                return t->weight;
        }
    }
    std::string msg = "malformed graph: no edge between ";
    msg += v;
    msg += " and ";
    msg += w;
    throw std::runtime_error(msg);
}

The above will at least warn you at runtime if the graph is not well formed. You could even make it throw two different exception depending on what problem has happened (edge(v,w) is false or the loop couldn't find a correct weight).

If you know that your graph isn't well formed, you can try to fix it, and see if it also fixes the segfault you are experiencing.

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This segment is just a better codding practice:

double Graph::getWeight(int v, int w)
{
    double result = 0.0;
    if(edge(v,w))
    {
        Node* t = adj[v];
        while(t != NULL)
        {
            t = t->next;
            if((t ->v) == w)
            result=t->weight;
        }
    }
    return result;
}
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Dare to explain why not? –  ashcliffe Dec 14 '12 at 22:03
    
Because it changes the semantics of the function: It no longer stops at the first match. –  melpomene Dec 14 '12 at 22:11

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