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I'm using Entity Framework 5 with a code first approach.

I have two classes that have a many-to-many relationship to each other, Movie and Person. A Movie is related to a Person via a Character. Each Movie can have multiple characters.

public class Movie {
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public int? Year { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Character> Characters { get; set; } 

    public Movie() {
        Characters = new HashSet<Character>();
    }
}

public class Character {
    public string Name { get; set; }    
    public virtual Movie Movie { get; set; }    
    public virtual Person Person { get; set; }
}

public class Person {
    public int Id { get;set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Character> Characters { get; set; }

    public Person() {
        Characters = new HashSet<Character>();
    }
}

Sometimes a Movie can have one Person that plays more than one Character. I'm running into a problem when trying to add a Movie under this circumstance...

Let's say Movie1 has 2 characters both played by Person1. When saving changes EF will start at Character1 and see that Person1 doesn't exist in the database and insert that Person to dbo.Person. Then it will go to Character2 but see that Person1 already exists and will throw a primary key violation.

In my MovieRepository I have an Add(Movie entity) method. I loop through each Character of the Movie and check to see if the related Person exists in the database. If they do then I set the Person property to the existing Person. This works under normal cases but if the Person doesn't exist at all then I'm not sure how to avoid the PK violation, and this is my problem :)

public class MovieRepository : Repository<Movie> {
    public MovieRepository(MovieContext context) : base(context) {}

    public override void Add(Movie entity) {
        foreach (var character in entity.Characters) {
            var person = Context.People.FirstOrDefault(p => p.Id == character.Person.Id);
            if (person != null)
                character.Person = person;
        }
        Context.Movies.Add(entity);
    }
}

Just to add a little more info. I'm using the Repository Pattern with the Unit Of Work pattern to hold my Repositories and Context. So the UnitOfWork class is responsible for SaveChanges().

Trying to do this in the MovieRepository.Add() may not be the best/appropriate way to accomplish this task. I look forward to any and all suggestions.

Just for further clarification I am getting my data from the Rotten Tomatoes API and the json looks something like this...

{data : [{
    Id: 12345,
    Title: 'Movie1',
    Year: 2010,
    Character: [{
        Name: 'Character1',
        Person: { Id: 1, Name: 'Person1' }
    },{
        Name: 'Character2',
        Person: { Id: 2, Name: 'Person2' }
    }]
}]}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

How are you sending in the same person object for 2 characters? Does it already have a unique key set? otherwise they will be seen as two separate objects by the Entity Framework. If you already have a unique key defined you could simply check the Local collection first, then context or else add the person to the context.

// Only works if the unique key is already defined.
var person =
    Context.People.Local.FirstOrDefault(p => p.Id == character.Person.Id) ??
    Context.People.FirstOrDefault(p => p.Id == character.Person.Id);

if (person == null)
    Context.People.Add(person);

However I would suggest possibly changing your aggregates so that this method does not add people at all. You could treat adding a person and adding a 'Movie" (as an aggregate of {Movie, Character} as 2 separate operations. This would make sense if you manage people separately (such that a person can have zero or many characters).

This would make more sense since the Movie does not "own" the people, it is a many to many relation.

For example in the UI: When adding a movie with characters you get to chose the person who played the character, or at this point add a new one. Thus when sending the movie to be saved you will always have a character.PersonId which will point to the person object which has already been saved.

Though of course this may not work for your particular scenario, just an idea.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes the unique key for Person is already set. The data is coming from the Rotten Tomatoes API. I updated my question above to include a sample of the json that I am serializing and trying to save in the db. –  bflemi3 Dec 17 '12 at 14:30
    
Ah yes fair enough. –  brentmckendrick Dec 17 '12 at 20:46

If I understand the problem correctly this only occurs when:

  1. The person did not previously exist in the DB
  2. The person plays more than one character in the Movie?

More explicitly, Do you have the same failure if a Person who already exists in the DB plays two Characters in a Movie?

It sounds like you may need to ensure you persist (save) a new person before using them a second time?

Something like:

public class MovieRepository : Repository<Movie> {
public MovieRepository(MovieContext context) : base(context) {}

public override void Add(Movie entity) {
    foreach (var character in entity.Characters) {
        var person = Context.People.FirstOrDefault(p => p.Id == character.Person.Id);
        if (person != null) {
            character.Person = person;
        } else {
            personRepository.Save(character.Person)
        }
    }
    Context.Movies.Add(entity);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your assumptions are correct. Are u suggesting I SaveChanges() on the context for every new Person? If so, wouldn't that be inefficient? –  bflemi3 Dec 15 '12 at 0:30
    
I suppose there might be a performance hit to it, over 'batching' them, but I doubt it would be significant. I would try it and address a performance problem if it arises. –  Matthew Dec 15 '12 at 16:48
    
Just noted the Context.Repo.Local. lookup, this is where some experience in EF (which I am still learning) helps. I have done a lot more work in Java/Hibernate. I was unable to comment above but that fixes your concern with my approach completely. Thanks Brent! –  Matthew Dec 17 '12 at 16:22

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