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Let's say you had something like a TV show listing, where you had a show title, and a show description. You want the listing to be accessible for people with disabilities as well.

Would it make more sense to use a definition list:

<dl>
    <dt>...title...</dt><dd>...description...</dd>
    ...
</dl>

Or an unordered list with headings?

<ul>
    <li><h3>...title...</h3><p>...description...</p></li>
    ...
</ul>

Which makes more semantic sense and will respond better to screen readers? (knowing that they can both be styled the same way)

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3  
Neither dl nor ul says anything about the meaning of the content, and meaning is what “semantic” means. So the issue is just about people’s opinions of “semantic” in a non-semantic meaning, and not constructive at all. –  Jukka K. Korpela Dec 14 '12 at 22:13
    
You have completely ignored the second point: accessibility and screen readers. –  Diodeus Dec 14 '12 at 22:20
    
the “second point” is not reflected in the heading at all, a separate issue, and very vague. –  Jukka K. Korpela Dec 14 '12 at 23:29
    
Screen readers usually have a special buffer for headings which allow the user to scan just the headings, not sure if they do for dt. –  steveax Dec 15 '12 at 2:07

3 Answers 3

I prefer the former. First, it seems to make more sense to me just based on the content.

But that's me. I think the markup should reflect the document structure, and since (as you say) the CSS can style it either way, why not make the markup reflect the content? A list containing items that contain a header for a title, followed by a description seems a bit of overkill to me.

But, hey. You know what they say about opinions.

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If you are using HTML 4.01, you shouldn't use dl as it's defined as "definition list" (and your example does not consist of terms and their definitions). If you are using HTML5, the use of dl is fine, because the definition of dl changed.

Using headings inside of li might be a bit problematic regarding the document outline. The scope of a heading would include the start of the next li: <li><!--scope start--><h3>title</h3><p>description</p></li><li><!--scope end--><h3>…. By using section (resp. article), this could be avoided.

So, for HTML5, I think the following ways are possible:

dl

<dl>

  <dt>Title1</dt>
  <dd>Description1</dd>

  <dt>Title2</dt>
  <dd>Description2</dd>

</dl>

That would be my favorite, if you only want to provide title and description for each show (if not, see the last example).

ul + section

<ul>

  <li>
    <section>
      <h1>Title1</h1>
      <p>Description1</p>
    </section>
  </li>

  <li>
    <section>
      <h1>Title2</h1>
      <p>Description2</p>
    </section>
  </li>

</ul>

I don't like that very much. The list isn't adding much here, so why not omit it? (see next example)

headings only

<section>
  <h1>Title1</h1>
  <p>Description1</p>
</section>

<section>
  <h1>Title2</h1>
  <p>Description2</p>
</section>

Instead of section the article element might be possible, too.

You could also omit section (or article) and use headings only (in the case of section it wouldn't change the meaning); in that case you'd need to apply the correct heading level.

headings + dl

If you want to provide additional metadata (maybe in the future), I'd go with the following markup:

<section>
  <h1>Title1</h1>
  <dl>
    <dt>Description</dt>
    <dd>…</dd>
    <dt>Rating</dt>
    <dd>…</dd>
    <dt>Time</dt>
    <dd>…</dd>
    <dt>Length</dt>
    <dd>…</dd>
  </dl>
</section>
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I don't recomend using ul+h1 and so does the W3C: Note: While it is conforming to include heading elements inside li elements, it likely does not convey the semantics that the author intended. A heading starts a new section, so a heading in a list implicitly splits the list into spanning multiple sections. –  Ryan B Dec 17 '12 at 13:51
    
@Ryan: Yeah, that's what I thought. But if you explicitly use section, this should be no problem anymore, I guess. –  unor Dec 18 '12 at 7:02
    
From what I can tell, sections create their own world or bubble within a document. On the other hand ul/ol convey that these guys (li) stick together, so you have a contradiction. –  Ryan B Dec 18 '12 at 13:37

In this case using a Definition list makes much more sense. Aside from this though, is it really necessary to use a list at all? It may make more sense just to use your Heading tags appropriately on the page wit a tag (x= 2-6) and have everything apply under the header of that. TV Shows in specific it may not make sense to use a "List" to display them with definitions or anything else. Again, they can be styled however, so i'm only worried about sematics with this.

Hope this helps Zach

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