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I have a table like this:

+----+---------+---------+
| Id | column1 | column2 |
+----+---------+---------+
|  1 | a       | b       |
|  2 | a       | b       |
+----+---------+---------+

and a query like this SELECT * FROM table WHERE id IN (1,2,3)

what query do I need to get a result like this(I need to get null values for nonexisten id's):

+----+---------+---------+
| Id | column1 | column2 |
+----+---------+---------+
|  1 | a       | b       |
|  2 | a       | b       |
|  3 | null    | null    |
+----+---------+---------+

EDIT

Thanks for the responses so far.

Is there a more 'dynamic way' to do this, the query above it's just an example. In reality I need to check around 1000 id's!

share|improve this question
1  
why not create a temp table with the id values you want, them left outer join the real table to the temp table? – NuclearGhost Dec 14 '12 at 22:10
    
@NuclearGhost: creating a temporary table is not required; using an inline view right within the query text is a much simpler approach. The temporary table would be an appropriate workaround if there a lot of id values, and the statement exceeds (or approaches) the maximum length for a SQL statement ( = max_allowed_packet_size) – spencer7593 Dec 14 '12 at 22:33
1  
but where do you get those 1000 ids? if you get them from a query, you can still use a LEFT JOIN like in my answer to get the result that you want... – fthiella Dec 15 '12 at 15:44
1  
To return that Id value, which may not exist in any row in the table, you need to have a rowsource that returns the values. (I'm not providing an answer, because it would essentially duplicate the answer from fthiella. If I want to return an arbitrary set of integer values (e.g. 1,3,7), the right way to do that is with a query like SELECT 1 AS Id UNION ALL SELECT 3 UNION ALL SELECT 7. Then wrap that query in parens, and use it as an inline view. It doesn't get any more dynamic than that. – spencer7593 Dec 17 '12 at 15:54
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could use something like this:

SELECT ids.ID, your_table.column1, your_table.column2
FROM
  (SELECT 1 as ID
   UNION ALL SELECT 2
   UNION ALL SELECT 3) ids left join your_table
  on ids.ID = your_table.ID

First subquery returns each value you need in a different row. Then you can try to join each row with your_table. If you use a left join, all values from the first subquery are shown, and if there's a match with your_table, values from your_table are shown, otherwise you will get nulls.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1. I'd recommend using the UNION ALL operator in place of the UNION operator. – spencer7593 Dec 14 '12 at 22:25
1  
@spencer7593 UNION removes duplicates while UNION ALL doesn't... and since we don't need to remove duplicates... yes it's better to use union ALL... thanks! – fthiella Dec 14 '12 at 22:29

That is not the way SQL works unfortunately. I would think it would be pretty trivial for your application to determine the differences between the id's it asked for and the id's returned.

So rather than hack or some weird query to mock up your result, why not have your application handle it?

I still can't understand though what the use case might be to where you would be querying rows on teh database by id's that may or may not exist.

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