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Can someone shed some light on what commands i can use to obtain the following from hard drives. It would be best if there was an internal Python module for this, but probably not. I do have root access to obtain any information, but i would like to stay away from having to download extra packages, so:

procinfo, swapon, hdparm, hardinfo are out of the picture, not default on Fedora 17, not sure about other distros.

Index (Device 0, could be more)
Description (Full Name, Western Digital Black Edition.....)
InterfaceType (IDE, SCSI)
Manufacturer (Western Digital, Seagate, Maxtor)
Model (WDxxx)
Size (in KB, MB or GB)
Partitions (if Any)
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Check out sysfs. For example, for the first disk on my Ubuntu 12.04 system most of that information can be read from or inferred by the presence of the following files and directories:

  • /sys/block/sda/dev
  • /sys/block/sda/device/scsi_device
  • /sys/block/sda/device/vendor (actually "ATA," implying SATA, not "Western Digital" as might be expected)
  • /sys/block/sda/device/model
  • /sys/block/sda/size
  • /sys/block/sda/sda1
  • /sys/block/sda/sda2
  • /sys/block/sda/sda5
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I can't use 'sysfs' since its not default on Fedora 17, but, I can definitely use the commands listed! Do you know if they are available in most Linux distros on base install? This is great, thank you very much. –  Dayan Dec 15 '12 at 11:09

I think i found a good terminal command that seems to provide a lot of the information i requested, plus much more.

fdisk -l

Now the question remains on how to parse this amount of data!

Output from fdisk-l

Disk /dev/sda: 750.2 GB, 750156374016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 91201 cylinders, total 1465149168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xf4375e1b

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *        2048      206847      102400    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda2          206848   895822804   447807978+   7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda3      1151823870  1465147391   156661761    5  Extended
/dev/sda4       895823872  1100623871   102400000   83  Linux
/dev/sda5      1151823872  1435025407   141600768   83  Linux
/dev/sda6      1435027456  1465147391    15059968   82  Linux swap / Solaris

Partition table entries are not in disk order

Disk /dev/sdb: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders, total 1953525168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x3ac08bdc

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdb1            2048  1953521663   976759808    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT

Disk /dev/sdc: 16.0 GB, 16008609792 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 1946 cylinders, total 31266816 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdc1              32    31266815    15633392    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
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fdisk scares me :P –  Joran Beasley Dec 14 '12 at 23:36
    
@Joran Beasley Tell me about it! That output looks depressing!! –  Dayan Dec 14 '12 at 23:38
2  
This is really easy to parse - if a line starts with "Disk /", it is the beginning of a disk entry. As it and the next five lines have a fixed format, all interesting data can be extracted with a simple split on whitespace (just pick the indices of the fields you're interested in). Skip the two lines after that and you are at the beginning of the partition table, which again just needs to be split into the fields. –  l4mpi Dec 14 '12 at 23:47
    
@l4mpi Thanks, that's a good method ;) –  Dayan Dec 14 '12 at 23:49
1  
@mmgp: You can handle the localized fdisk output with re—or really, even with just split. In every language, '255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 1946 cylinders, total 31266816 sectors'.split()` only has four words that match .isdigit(). I agree that this isn't the best way to do it, but it's not impossible, or even that hard. –  abarnert Dec 15 '12 at 1:07

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