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I've recently discovered how to "properly" use CSS animations (previously I dismissed them as not being able to make complex sequences like you could in JavaScript). So now I'm learning about them.

For this effect, I'm trying to have a gradient "flare" sweep across a progress bar-like element. Similar to the effect on native Windows Vista/7 progress bars.

@keyframes barshine {
  from {background-image:linear-gradient(120deg,rgba(255,255,255,0) -10%,rgba(255,255,255,0.25) -5%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 0%);}
  to {background-image:linear-gradient(120deg,rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%,rgba(255,255,255,0.25) 105%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 110%);}
}
.progbar {
  animation: barshine 1s 4s linear infinite;
}

As you can see, I am trying to have a delay of 4 seconds, followed by the shine sweeping across in 1 second, repeated.

However, it seems that the animation-delay only applies to the first iteration, after which the shine just keeps sweeping across repeatedly.

I "resolved" this issue as follows:

@keyframes expbarshine {
  from {background-image:linear-gradient(120deg,rgba(255,255,255,0) -10%,rgba(255,255,255,0.25) -5%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 0%);}
  80% {background-image:linear-gradient(120deg,rgba(255,255,255,0) -10%,rgba(255,255,255,0.25) -5%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 0%);}
  to {background-image:linear-gradient(120deg,rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%,rgba(255,255,255,0.25) 105%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 110%);}
}
.progbar {
  animation: barshine 5s linear infinite;
}

from and 80% are exactly the same, resulting in a "delay" of 80% of the animation length.

This works, but for my next animation, I need the delay to be variable (constant for a particular element, but variable among elements that use the animation), while the animation itself stays exactly the same length.

With the above "solution", I would end up with a slower animation when all I want is a longer delay.

Is it possible to have the animation-delay apply to all iterations, rather than just the first?

share|improve this question
    
Unfortunately, no. animation-delay is the delay before the animation starts, and there's no other property like it. There's a bad workaround with JavaScript that you'd probably rather not use :) –  minitech Dec 16 '12 at 18:59

3 Answers 3

minitech is right in that animation-delay specifies the delay before the animation starts and NOT the delay in between iterations. The editors draft of the spec describes it well and there was a discussion of this feature you're describing here which suggesting this iteration delay feature.

While there may be a workaround in JS, you can fake this iteration delay for the progress bar flare using only CSS.

By declaring the flare div position:absolute and the parent div overflow: hidden, setting the 100% keyframe state greater than the width of the progress bar, and playing around with the cubic-bezier timing function and left offset values, you're able to emulate an ease-in-out or linear timing with a "delay".

It'd be interesting to write a less/scss mixin to calculate exactly the left offset and timing function to get this exact, but I don't have the time at the moment to fiddle with it. Would love to see something like that though!

Here's a demo I threw together to show this off. (I tried to emulate the windows 7 progress bar and fell a bit short, but it demonstrates what I'm talking about)

Demo: http://codepen.io/timothyasp/full/HlzGu

<!-- HTML -->
<div class="bar">
   <div class="progress">
      <div class="flare"></div>
   </div>
</div>


/* CSS */

@keyframes progress {
  from {
    width: 0px;
  }
  to {
    width: 600px;
  }
}

@keyframes barshine {
  0% {
    left: -100px;
  }

  100% {
    left: 1000px;
  }
}
.flare {
  animation-name: barshine;
  animation-duration: 3s;
  animation-direction: normal;
  animation-fill-mode: forwards;
  animation-timing-function: cubic-bezier(.14, .75, .2, 1.01);
  animation-iteration-count: infinite;
  left: 0;
  top: 0;
  height: 40px;
  width: 100px;
  position: absolute;
  background: -moz-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover,  rgba(255,255,255,0.69) 0%, rgba(255,255,255,0) 87%); /* FF3.6+ */
  background: -webkit-gradient(radial, center center, 0px, center center, 100%, color-stop(0%,rgba(255,255,255,0.69)), color-stop(87%,rgba(255,255,255,0))); /* Chrome,Safari4+ */
  background: -webkit-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover,  rgba(255,255,255,0.69) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 87%); /* Chrome10+,Safari5.1+ */
  background: -o-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover,  rgba(255,255,255,0.69) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 87%); /* Opera 12+ */
  background: -ms-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover,  rgba(255,255,255,0.69) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 87%); /* IE10+ */
  background: radial-gradient(ellipse at center,  rgba(255,255,255,0.69) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 87%); /* W3C */
  filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#b0ffffff', endColorstr='#00ffffff',GradientType=1 ); /* IE6-9 fallback on horizontal gradient */
  z-index: 10;
}
.progress {
  animation-name: progress;
  animation-duration: 10s;
  animation-delay: 1s;
  animation-timing-function: linear;
  animation-iteration-count: infinite;
  overflow: hidden;
  position:relative;
  z-index: 1;
  height: 100%;
  width: 100%;
  border-right: 1px solid #0f9116;
  background: #caf7ce; /* Old browsers */
  background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #caf7ce 0%, #caf7ce 18%, #3fe81e 45%, #2ab22a 96%); /* FF3.6+ */
  background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0%,#caf7ce), color-stop(18%,#caf7ce), color-stop(45%,#3fe81e), color-stop(96%,#2ab22a)); /* Chrome,Safari4+ */
  background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #caf7ce 0%,#caf7ce 18%,#3fe81e 45%,#2ab22a 96%); /* Chrome10+,Safari5.1+ */
  background: -o-linear-gradient(top, #caf7ce 0%,#caf7ce 18%,#3fe81e 45%,#2ab22a 96%); /* Opera 11.10+ */
  background: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #caf7ce 0%,#caf7ce 18%,#3fe81e 45%,#2ab22a 96%); /* IE10+ */
  background: linear-gradient(to bottom, #caf7ce 0%,#caf7ce 18%,#3fe81e 45%,#2ab22a 96%); /* W3C */
filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#caf7ce', endColorstr='#2ab22a',GradientType=0 ); /* IE6-9 */
}

.progress:after {
  content: "";
  width: 100%;
  height: 29px;
  right: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  position: absolute;
  z-index: 3;
  background: -moz-linear-gradient(left, rgba(202,247,206,0) 0%, rgba(42,178,42,1) 100%); /* FF3.6+ */
  background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, right top, color-stop(0%,rgba(202,247,206,0)), color-stop(100%,rgba(42,178,42,1))); /* Chrome,Safari4+ */
  background: -webkit-linear-gradient(left, rgba(202,247,206,0) 0%,rgba(42,178,42,1) 100%); /* Chrome10+,Safari5.1+ */
  background: -o-linear-gradient(left, rgba(202,247,206,0) 0%,rgba(42,178,42,1) 100%); /* Opera 11.10+ */
  background: -ms-linear-gradient(left, rgba(202,247,206,0) 0%,rgba(42,178,42,1) 100%); /* IE10+ */
  background: linear-gradient(to right, rgba(202,247,206,0) 0%,rgba(42,178,42,1) 100%); /* W3C */
  filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#00caf7ce', endColorstr='#2ab22a',GradientType=1 ); /* IE6-9 */
}

.bar {
  margin-top: 30px;
  height: 40px;
  width: 600px;
  position: relative;
  border: 1px solid #777;
  border-radius: 3px;
}
share|improve this answer
6  
Typical CSS. They provide CSS animations so it's not done in Javascript, and the styling is all in one place, but then if you want to do anything more than the bare basics then you have to implement a maze of hacks. Why don't they just implement things that make it easier for developers? –  Jonathan. Aug 23 '13 at 13:52

I had a similar problem and used

@-webkit-keyframes pan {
   0%, 10%       { -webkit-transform: translate3d( 0%, 0px, 0px); }
   90%, 100%     { -webkit-transform: translate3d(-50%, 0px, 0px); }
}

Bit irritating that you have to fake your duration to account for 'delays' at either end.

share|improve this answer

This is what you should do. It should work in that you have a 1 second animation, then a 4 second delay between iterations:

@keyframes barshine {
  0% {
  background-image:linear-gradient(120deg,rgba(255,255,255,0) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0.25) -5%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 0%);
  }
  20% {
    background-image:linear-gradient(120deg,rgba(255,255,255,0) 10%,rgba(255,255,255,0.25) 105%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 110%);
  }
}
.progbar {
  animation: barshine 5s 0s linear infinite;
}

So I've been messing around with this a lot and you can do it without being very hacky. This is the simplest way to put in a delay between animation iterations that's 1. SUPER EASY and 2. just takes a little logic. Check out this dance animation I've made:

.dance{
  animation-name: dance;
  -webkit-animation-name: dance;

  animation-iteration-count: infinite;
  -webkit-animation-iteration-count: infinite;
  animation-duration: 2.5s;
  -webkit-animation-duration: 2.5s;

  -webkit-animation-delay: 2.5s;
  animation-delay: 2.5s;
  animation-timing-function: ease-in;
  -webkit-animation-timing-function: ease-in;

}
@keyframes dance {
  0% {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(0deg);
    transform: rotate(0deg);
  }
  25% {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    transform: rotate(-120deg);
  }
  50% {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(20deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(20deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(20deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(20deg);
    transform: rotate(20deg);
  }
  100% {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(0deg);
    transform: rotate(0deg);
  }
}

@-webkit-keyframes dance {
  0% {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(0deg);
    transform: rotate(0deg);
  }
  20% {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(20deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(20deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(20deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(20deg);
    transform: rotate(20deg);
  }
  40% {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    transform: rotate(-120deg);
  }
  60% {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(0deg);
    transform: rotate(0deg);
  }
  80% {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    transform: rotate(-120deg);
  }
  95% {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(20deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(20deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(20deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(20deg);
    transform: rotate(20deg);
  }
}

I actually came here trying to figure out how to put a delay in the animation, when I realized that you just 1. extend the duration of the animation and shirt the proportion of time for each animation. Beore I had them each lasting .5 seconds for the total duration of 2.5 seconds. Now lets say i wanted to add a delay equal to the total duration, so a 2.5 second delay.

You animation time is 2.5 seconds and delay is 2.5, so you change duration to 5 seconds. However, because you doubled the total duration, you'll want to halve the animations proportion. Check the final below. This worked perfectly for me.

@-webkit-keyframes dance {
  0% {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(0deg);
    transform: rotate(0deg);
  }
  10% {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(20deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(20deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(20deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(20deg);
    transform: rotate(20deg);
  }
  20% {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    transform: rotate(-120deg);
  }
  30% {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(0deg);
    transform: rotate(0deg);
  }
  40% {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(-120deg);
    transform: rotate(-120deg);
  }
  50% {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(0deg);
    transform: rotate(0deg);
  }
}

In sum:

These are the calcultions you'd probably use to figure out how to change you animation's duration and the % of each part.

desired_duration = x

desired_duration = animation_part_duration1 + animation_part_duration2 + ... (and so on)

desired_delay = y

total duration = x + y

animation_part_duration1_actual = animation_part_duration1 * desired_duration / total_duration

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