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I've got a view and a map function, in CouchDB. I'm simply iterating over some values in an array, an emitting them individually. I'd like to exclude a property of the documents that I am emitting, though. I was hoping to just call delete on it, but that doesn't appear to be doing anything. The value is still emitted with the property. Is this a limitation in order to keep indexing fast? My map function looks like this:

function(doc) {
  if (doc.type == 'user' && doc.spaces) {
    doc.spaces.forEach(function (space) {
      if (space.tokens) {
        space.tokens.forEach(function (token) {
          emit(token.token, space);
        });
      }
    });
  }
}

Where I emit space, I'd like to delete the tokens property of it, before emitting. I don't want to expose other tokens in this data. So, I modified to code to look like this, with no luck. It still emits the full document, with tokens intact:

function(doc) {
  if (doc.type == 'user' && doc.spaces) {
    doc.spaces.forEach(function (space) {
      if (space.tokens) {
        var tokens = space.tokens;
        delete space.tokens;
        tokens.forEach(function (token) {
          emit(token.token, space);
        });
      }
    });
  }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

We've been bitten by this problem as well.

We worked around it by creating a new object and emitting that instead:

emit(token.token, {
  name :  space.name,
  id : space.id
  etc : etc
}

We found that was the best way anyway as most of the time there was no need to emit complete (child) documents and only what was required.

share|improve this answer
3  
That is due to "sealing": CouchDB JavaScript query server uses this SpiderMonkey feature to make documents unchangeable while he is processed by map functions. This prevents accidentally document modification and his processing in such state by other map functions. – Kxepal Dec 15 '12 at 11:14
2  
To be a bit more specific, the reference to "sealing" an object is about the ES5 feature (Object.seal()) that SpiderMonkey implements. – Dominic Barnes Dec 15 '12 at 16:19
    
i even tried setting it to a new variable, and it appears to remain sealed. var newobject = doc; – Ryan Dec 16 '12 at 0:17
1  
The reason that doesn't work is because newObject is just another reference to the same doc object. newObject points to the same "sealed" object. You will need to create a new object as in the example above. – AndyD Dec 16 '12 at 9:55

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