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I was wondering if using boost.any (Without RTTI) classes anywhere templates can be used will slow down the program. Since boost any is actually a wrapper around a template class, one could say that with the modern compiler-optimalisations it will produce the same effect, am I right?

tpl_vs_any.hpp

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

template<class T> class tpl
{
    T content;
public:
    tpl(const T& value) : content(value) {}
    operator T() const
    {
        return content;
    }
};

class any
{
public:

    any() : content(0) {}

    any(const any& other) : content(other.content -> clone()) {}

    template<class T> any(const T& value) : content(new holder<T>(value))
    {
    }

    ~any() 
    {
        delete content;
    }

    class placeholder
    {
    public:
        placeholder() {}
        virtual placeholder* clone() const = 0;
    };

    template<class T> class holder : public placeholder
    {
    public:
        T content;

        holder(const T& value) : content(value) {}
        ~holder() {}

        placeholder* clone() const
        {
            return new holder<T>(content);
        }
    };

    template<class T> operator T () const
    {
        return dynamic_cast<holder<T>*>(content)->content;
    }

    placeholder* content;
};

template<class T> void test()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000; ++i)
    {
        vector<T> a;
        a.push_back(23.23);
        a.push_back(3.14);

        double x = (double)a[0];
    }
}

So would it be correct to say that:

test<any>();

Is exactly as fast as:

test<tpl<double>>();

Assuming that you know, just like the compiler does at the second example, that boost::any is only used as double in this situation? (No RTTI for the any class).

I'm more wondering about the arguments for and against this thesis.

Also, are there specific situations where there is difference between those methods?

Edit: Performance test 2:

  • Example 1: 1,966.57 ms
  • Example 2: 1,320.37 ms

It seems like there is a relativly large difference.

Edit 2: Since it was not fair to compare the primary data type double against the class any I've made a new test:

#include "tpl_vs_any.hpp"

int main()
{
    test<any>();
    return 0;
}

Speed: 1,794.54 ms

#include "tpl_vs_any.hpp"

int main()
{
    test<tpl<double>>();
    return 0;
}

Speed: 1,715.57 ms

Tested it multiple times, pretty much the same benchmarks.

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3  
boost.any performs type erasure, RTTI and virtual function dispatch. It's not at all comparable to a straight-up statically compiled template. –  Kerrek SB Dec 15 '12 at 0:55
    
std::cout << e << std::endl; should fail compilation, there is no << operator defined for boost::any. What you need is boost::any_cast. And yes version with boost any will be slower than double, due to type-erasure and boost::any_cast uses typeid. for details on any you can refer: nullptr.me/2011/07/07/dissecting-any –  Sarang Dec 15 '12 at 0:57
3  
The time of your benchmarks are likely being dominated by writing to standard out. –  David Brown Dec 15 '12 at 1:52
    
Also why do you mention boost::any and then not use it in either of your benchmarks? –  David Brown Dec 15 '12 at 1:53
    
@David Brown class any is a minimalised version of boost::any without RTTI. I'll make a new test. –  Tim Dec 15 '12 at 1:55
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2 Answers

So would it be correct to say that:

...

Is exactly as fast as:

...

Assuming that you know, just like the compiler does at the second example, that boost::any is only used as double in this situation?

No. Current compilers do nowhere near that kind of level of introspection. boost::any will be slower.

Of course, you could just run the code and find out for yourself.

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Edited code example 1. Added some performance analyses. –  Tim Dec 15 '12 at 1:43
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boost::any internally holds a pointer to an object, which it allocates with new. One of the things that makes std::vector significantly faster than, say, std::list is that vector keeps all of its objects in a contiguous storage in a single allocation, which aside from the obvious reduction in memory allocation overhead, is also a lot more cache-friendly.

There's also the detail of adding RTTI to the allocation, which is generally trivial overhead, but in the case of really small types like double significantly increases the storage overhead.

boost::any is not part of the standard; it's a specific implementation of a specific template. So you might as well just benchmark it; there aren't a bunch of other competing "standard implementations".

share|improve this answer
    
I wasn't very clear about the fact that RTTI was irrelevant. "Assuming that you know, just like the compiler does at the second example, that boost::any is only used as double in this situation" –  Tim Dec 15 '12 at 1:44
    
@Tim, that doesn't get around the allocation, which imo is much more significant than RTTI. However, I think you are overestimating the compiler's ability to understand what's going on inside both std::vector and boost::any. –  rici Dec 15 '12 at 1:50
    
The difference is minimal, see my latest performance analyses. About the allocation; I suppose that the larger the class, the slighter the difference? –  Tim Dec 15 '12 at 2:22
    
@Tim, storage locality (cache) effects will be most apparent on large vectors. Probably large objects will reduce the difference here, too; I generally prefer to avoid vectors of large objects. (dequeues are a nice compromise.) There's some great slides in Stroustrup's 2012 Going Native keynote, pp 43-48 here: ecn.channel9.msdn.com/events/GoingNative12/GN12Cpp11Style.pdf I think the keynote itself is still available for viewing. I would expect that vector<boost::any> would act a lot more like the list than the vector in Stroustrup's benchmark. –  rici Dec 15 '12 at 3:44
    
Very interesting and clarifying article! Thank you for your feedback. –  Tim Dec 15 '12 at 10:52
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